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Full text of "Kansas City Maintenance Plan for Control of Ozone 2002"

2002 Kansas City Maintenance Plan for Control of Ozone 

Missouri Air Conservation Commission 
Adopted July 25, 2002 

Revised December 5, 2002 




Department of Natural Resources 
Air and Land Protection Division 
Air Pollution Control Program 
P.O. Box 176 
205 Jefferson Street 
Jefferson City, Missouri 65102 
Telephone (573) 751-4817 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Missouri's Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 
Submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 
By the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' 
Air Pollution Control Program 

Missouri Air Conservation Commission 
Adopted July 25, 2002 



Revised December 5, 2002 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The information analysis and documentation contained in this plan 
represents the cooperative effort of many agencies. The Missouri Department 
of Natural Resources' Air Pollution Control Program gratefully acknowledges 
participants from the following agencies. 

Kansas Department of Health and Environment 
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (Region VII) 
Mid- America Regional Council 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

Table of Contents 

ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 3 

1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 6 

1.1 TIME LINE HISTORY OF MAINTENANCE PLAN 6 

1.1-1 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions from 1 970 through 1 994 6 

1 . 1 .2 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions from 1995 through 1997 6 

1 . L3 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 1 998 8 

1.1.4 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 1 999 . 9 

1.1.5 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 2000 9 

1.1.6 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 2001 1 

1.1.7 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 2002 1 1 

1.2 KANSAS CITY OZONE MAINTENANCE PLAN COMPONENTS ... 11 

1.2.1 Administrative Requirements 11 

1 .2.2 Demonstration of Continued Attainment 1 1 

1 23 Tracking Plan's Progress & Inventory Provision 12 

1 .2 A Emission Inventory and Mobile Vehicle Budgets 1 2 

1.2.5 Contingency Measures 13 

1 .2.6 Provision for Operation of Monitoring Network 1 5 

1.2.7 Conformity 15 

2.0 THE 2002 KANSAS CITY OZONE MAINTENANCE PLAN 17 

2.1 ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS 17 

2.1.1 Legal Authority 1 7 

2. 1 .2 Public Hearing Notice and Certification 1 7 

2.1.3 Comments, Responses, and Explanations of Change 1 7 

2.1.4 MACC Adoption Certification 17 

2.2 DEMONSTRATION OF CONTINUED ATTAINMENT 18 

2.2.1 Demonstration of Decreasing Inventory Values 1 8 

2.2.2 Control Measures t 18 

2.2.2. 1 Department's Air Pollution Control Program Control Measures 1 8 

2.2.2.2 Federal Control Measures 20 

2.3 TRACKING PLAN'S PROGRESS & INVENTORY PROVISION 20 

2.3.1 Tracking the Plan's Progress 20 

2.3.1.1 Tracking Methods 20 

2.3 . 1 .2 Ambient Air Monitoring 2 1 

2.3.1.3 Expected Exceedances/Missing Data 27 

2.3.2 Provision for Emission Inventory Updates 27 

2.4 EMISSION INVENTORY AND MOTOR VEHICLE BUDGETS 28 

2.4. 1 Emission Inventory 28 

2.4.1.1 Mobile Source Emissions 30 

2.4. 1 .2 Biogenic Emissions 3 1 

2.4. 1 .3 Area Source Emissions 32 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

2.4. 1 .4 Point Source Emissions 32 

2.4. 1 .4. 1 APCP Point Source Emissions Calculation Method 33 

2.4.1 .4.2 KDHE Point Source Emissions Calculation Method 34 

2.4.2 New Mobile Source Budgets 34 

2.4.2.1 Existing Mobile Source Budget 34 

2.4.2.2 New Mobile Source Budget Calculations 36 

2.4.2.2.1 NOx Calculation 36 

2.4.2.2.2 VOC Calculation 36 

2.5 CONTINGENCY MEASURES 37 

2.6 PROVISION FOR OPERATION OF MONITORING NETWORK .... 39 

2.7 CONFORMITY 40 

3.0 REFERENCES 43 

3.1 LIST OF REFERENCES 43 

3.2 LIST OF TABLES 43 

3.3 LIST OF ACRONYMS 44 

3.4 LIST OF APPENDICES 45 

3.4.1 Appendix A 47 

3.4.2 Appendix B 49 

3.4.3 Appendix C 57 

3.4.4 AppendkD 69 

3.4.5 Appendix E __ 71 

3.4.6 Appendix F 79 

3.4.7 Appendix G 87 

3.4.8 Appendix H 93 

3.4.9 Appendix I 95 

3.4.10 Appendix J 101 

3.4.11 Appendix K 111 

3.4.12 Appendix L 113 

3.4.13 Appendix M _____ 115 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



1.0 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY 



LI TIME LINE HISTORY OF MAINTENANCE PLAN 



1.1.1 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions from 1970 through 1994 

The Clean Air Act (CAA) established National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) 
for the six criteria pollutants. The CAA requires any area that fails to attain the standard for 
any criteria pollutant to develop and implement a plan. In the 1 970s, the Kansas City 
Metropolitan Area (KCMA) was determined to be in violation of the ozone NAAQS. The 
state of Missouri developed and implemented the first Kansas City Ozone Implementation 
Plan in 1979. 

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) fully approved the 1979 Kansas City 
Ozone Implementation Plan and the KCMA was projected to meet the ozone NAAQS by 
December 31, 1982. The area appeared to meet the standard at that time. However, 
violations in 1983 and 1984 required the state to revise the 1979 ozone implementation plan. 

These required revisions to the 1979 Plan were included in the 1987 ozone implementation 
plan. The 1987 ozone implementation plan projected attainment of the ozone NAAQS by 
December 31, 1987. The EPA fully approved the 1987 ozone implementation plan on 
November 2, 1989. However, three violations in the monitoring period from 1986 through 
1988 halted the re-designation effort. 

Ozone monitoring data from 1987 through 1991 demonstrated that the area had attained 
the standard. In accordance with the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1 990 (CAAA), the 
Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Air Pollution Control Program revised the 
Missouri Ozone Plan for the KCMA to recognize that the area had achieved the ozone 
NAAQS. The EPA published final approval of the maintenance plan on June 23, 1992. The 
maintenance plan became effective on July 23 , 1992. This action officially re-designated the 
KCMA to attainment. 

1.1.2 MAINTENANCE PLAN ISSUES AND ACTIONS FROM 1995 THROUGH 1997 

The KCMA experienced a violation of the ozone standard in the summer of 1 995. This 
violation mandated the implementation of the contingency control measures listed in the 
maintenance plan adopted in 1992. These control measures included: 

1) Emissions offsets of 1 : 1 for all major sources; 

2) Stage II Vapor Recovery or Enhanced Inspection and Maintenance (I/M); 

3) Transportation Control Measures (TCM) achieving a 0.5% reduction in area Volatile 
Organic Compounds (VOC) emissions; and 

4) A comprehensive emission inventory. 

The states of Missouri and Kansas, along with the Mid- America Regional Council 
(MARC), expressed to the EPA that they wished to amend the control measures listed in the 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



contingency section of the 1992 implementation plan. The EPA agreed that the measures 
could be changed as long as the revised plan achieved the same level of control. 

The states asked the MARC Air Quality Forum to aid in the review of the control measures 
available to the KCMA. The Air Quality Forum convened the Ozone Subcommittee to 
conduct a technical analysis of the control measures. The Ozone Subcommittee evaluated 
the following major control measures: federal reformulated gasoline (RFG), low Reid Vapor 
Pressure (RVP) gasoline, Stage II Vapor Recovery, and I/M (14 different programs). The 
Ozone Subcommittee also evaluated transportation control measures including: 

1) Free transit for high ozone season; 

2) Free transit on red skycast days; 

3) Commuter rail in Interstate 35 corridor; 

4) Increased bus service for high ozone season; 

5) Light rail transit, clean fuel fleets; 

6) Lanes for high occupancy vehicles; 

7) Enhanced traffic signalization on arterial routes; 

8) Nontraditional work scheduling and commuting; 

9) Telecommuting; 

1 0) Parking surcharges; and 

11) Taxes on vehicles miles traveled and gasoline. 



The Air Quality Forum reviewed the Ozone Subcommittee report and recommended the 
following control measures: 

1) Expanded public education; 

2) Low RVP gasoline; 

3) Motor vehicle I/M; 

4) Seasonal no-fare transit; and 

5) Clean fuel fleets. 

The Air Quality Forum also recommended enhanced traffic signalization, expanded transit, 
expanded Heartland Sky program, land use planning, air quality data collection, expanded 
public education, and a stationary source study as supplementary measures. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program prepared a revised maintenance plan, 
which was presented at public hearing on April 24, 1997. The plan was then presented to the 
Missouri Air Conservation Commission (MACC) for adoption at the June 28, 1997, meeting. 
The commission recommended that the department's Air Pollution Control Program revise 
the plan to include Stage II Vapor Recovery in the place of an I/M Program. The decision to 
relinquish the I/M Program was made partially due to the difficulty in implementing such a 
program considering the extended length of time necessary to develop it and put it into 
action. At the July 24, 1 997, MACC meeting, the commission members agreed to allow the 
department's Air Pollution Control Program some time to reconsider the control strategies 
for the Kansas City area with the MARC Air Quality Forum and the local agencies. The 
commission directed the department's Air Pollution Control Program to bring the plan back 
for public hearing no later than December of 1 997. 

The Air Quality Forum held a meeting on September 3,1997, to discuss the control 
options. The discussions at this meeting also addressed a second violation of the ozone 
standard, which occurred on August 28, 1997. The Air Quality Forum convened again on 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



October 7, 1997, to recommend the control strategies for the KCMA. The forum 
recommended the implementation of expanded public education and Heartland Sky 
programs, RFG, stationary source reductions, air quality data collection, and supplementary 
control measures including: 

1) Seasonal reduced-fare and transit; 

2) Clean cities programs; 

3) Enhanced traffic signalization; 

4) Expanded transit program; and 

5) Land use planning. 

The Air Quality Forum recommended the inclusion of Stage II Vapor Recovery as a 
contingency in the event the implementation of the RFG program was unsuccessful. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program amended the revised maintenance plan to 
reflect the latest MARC recommendations. One important element of the maintenance plan 
was left to the MACC to determine. This element was the implementation year for RFG. 
The department's Air Pollution Control Program drafted the plan with language requesting 
comments on an implementation date. As recommended, the department's Air Pollution 
Control Program also included a Stage II Vapor Recovery regulation to be promulgated if the 
RFG program could not be implemented. 

1.1 J Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 1998 

On February 3, 1998, the MACC adopted the revised Kansas City Ozone Maintenance 
Plan. The commission also set the recommended implementation date for the RFG program 
as April 1 5, 2000. The department's Air Pollution Control Program committed to request the 
Governor of Missouri to opt the Missouri counties of the KCMA into the federal RFG 
program. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program sent the revised maintenance plan to the 
EPA, Region VII on March 25, 1998. The EPA found the revised maintenance plan 
complete on May 26, 1998, 

As was required in the maintenance plan, the department's Air Pollution Control Program 
updated the MACC on the status of the Federal RFG amendment at the August 1 998 
meeting. The department's Air Pollution Control Program recommended that the 
commission delay any action until the September 24, 1998, MACC meeting. The EPA 
finalized the Federal opt-in rule amendment to allow Kansas City as a former non-attainment 
area to opt-in the Federal RFG program on September 29, 1998. 

At the September 24, 1998, MACC meeting, the Departments Air pollution Control 
Program requested direction from the commission on moving forward with the maintenance 
plan as adopted. The department's Air Pollution Control Program informed the commission 
that the EPA had passed the needed regulation allowing Missouri and Kansas to request RFG 
for Kansas City. The commission agreed that the department's Air Pollution Control 
Program should move forward with the maintenance plan as adopted. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



1.1.4 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 1999 

On May 27, 1999, the EPA published a conditional approval of the maintenance plan. The 
conditions of this approval were that the governor of Missouri opt-in to the federal RFG 
program and the state implement a regulation for a state fuel, or implement Stage II Vapor 
Recovery by April 15, 2000. 

On April 6, 1 999, the EPA disapproved the Long Range Transportation Plan (LRTP) for 
the KCMA. The Federal Highway Administration stopped approving new roadway projects 
on May 7, 1999. July 28, 1999 was set as the date that highway funding would begin to be 
withheld. 

On June 2 and 3, 1999, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), in 
conjunction with the department's Air Pollution Control Program, held a Kansas City Fuels 
Summit to discuss the implementation of the ozone maintenance plan options. While the 
fuels summit did not clearly result in the recommendation of the federal RFG program, the 
summit did illustrate the difficulties of not pursuing federal RFG. 

On July 27 and 28, 1999, Governor Graves of Kansas and Missouri Governor Carnahan 
respectively, signed letters (See Appendix E) requesting that the KCMA be included in the 
federal RFG program. Submitting the opt-in letters to the EPA brought the LRTP into 
conformity, thereby making the plan approvable and allowing federal highway funding 
distribution again. 

However, on November 9, 1999, the United States Court of Appeals for the District of 
Columbia Circuit issued an order to stay the effectiveness of the EPA amendments to 40 
CFR part 80 Subpart 70(k). This stay prevented former nonattainment areas to opt-in to the 
federal RFG program. 

1 .1 .5 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 2000 

On January 4, 2000, the same court revoked the EPA's rulemaking. The action of the 
court eliminated the availability of RFG for the KCMA at this time. The department's Air 
Pollution Control Program met with petroleum interests serving KCMA on March 3, March 
20, and April 1 1 to discuss the availability of an RFG-like fuel for KCMA. The petroleum 
industry committed to providing a 7.0 RVP gasoline in the KCMA. This gasoline alone 
would not meet the emission reduction needed for the maintenance plan. The states would 
have to make up the difference in emission reductions through stationary source controls. 

The EPA sent Governor Carnahan a letter dated April 11, 2000, which started a 90-day 
clock. Within this 90 days, the state was required to develop and submit a revised control 
strategy for the KCMA to replace the RFG strategy that was no longer a viable option. 

On June 13, 2000, the Air Quality Forum voted to reaffirm their recommendation that 
Stage II Vapor Recovery be implemented if a state RFG-like fuel was not available to the 
KCMA. On June 29, 2000, the MARC Board of Directors also voted to reaffirm their 
commitment to implement Stage II Vapor Recovery if a state RFG-like fuel is not available 
for the KCMA. 

The state of Kansas sent a letter (see Appendix E) to the EPA committing to a 7.0 RVP 
gasoline and a cold solvent cleaning rule on July 7, 2000. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



In addition, the state of Missouri sent a letter (see Appendix E), on August 22, 2000, 
committing to implement a 7.0 RVP regulation and a cold solvent cleaning regulation. In 
addition, department's Air Pollution Control Program committed to amend the Stage I Vapor 
Recovery Program in KCMA to include enhanced reporting and record keeping, increased 
inspection frequency, and installation of pressure vacuum relief valves. In addition, the 
department's Air Pollution Control Program proposed rule 10 CSR 10-2.205 Control of 
Emissions from Aerospace Manufacturing and Rework Facilities. This rule was identified in 
the Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan adopted in 1992 as a possible stationary source 
control, which the department's Air Pollution Control Program committed to pursue. This 
rule was presented at a public hearing on October 26, 2000. The rule was adopted by the 
MACC on December 7, 2000, and became effective on March 30, 2001. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program filed a new rule 10 CSR 10-2.215 Control 
of Emissions from Solvent Cleanup Operations on August 30, 2000. This rulemaking was 
identified in the Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan adopted in 1 992 as a possible 
stationary source control, which the department's Air Pollution Control Program committed 
to pursue. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program filed an amendment to rule 10 CSR 10- 
2.330 Control of Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure on September 26, 2000. This rule was part 
of the Governor's commitment letter that replaced the RFG commitment in the Kansas City 
Ozone Maintenance Plan. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program filed an amendment to rule 1 CSR 1 0- 
2.260 Control of Petroleum Liquid Storage, Loading, and Transfer on December 1, 2000. 
This rule was part of the Governor's commitment letter that replaced the RFG commitment 
in the Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan. 

1.1.6 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 2001 

Rule 10 CSR 10-2.215 was adopted by the MACC on February 6, 2001, and became 
effective on May 30, 2001. The 10 CSR 10-2.330 rule amendment was adopted by the 
MACC on February 6, 2001, and became effective on May 30, 2001. The 10 CSR 10-2.260 
rule amendment was adopted by the MACC on March 29, 2001, and became effective on 
July 30, 2001 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program filed an amendment to rule 10 CSR 10- 
2.210 Control of Emissions from Solvent Metal Cleaning on January 29, 2001 . This rule was 
part of the Governor's commitment letter that replaced the RFG commitment in the Kansas 
City Ozone Maintenance Plan. The amendment requires low vapor solvents to be used for 
cold cleaning. This rule amendment was adopted by the MACC on May 24, 2001 , and 
became effective on October 30, 2001. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program worked with the State of Kansas and 
. MARC to develop the 1999 emission inventory for Kansas City Maintenance Area. The 
inventory has been completed. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



1.1.7 Maintenance Plan Issues and Actions in 2002 

In late January 2002, MOBILE 6 was issued by the EPA for use in calculating on-road 
mobile emissions. The department's Air Pollution Control Program through the interagency 
consultation group process and with the assistance of MARC elected to use MOBILE6 in 
calculating on-road mobile emissions and to develop area, point and off-road emissions 
inventory numbers for 1999. 

On June 11, 2002, MARC Board approved the Mobile Budgets. On June 28 th the 2002 
Maintenance Plan for Control of Ozone with the Mobile Budgets included was submitted to 
Public Hearing. On July 25, 2002 the 2002 Maintenance Plan for Control of Ozone plan was 
adopted by the MACC. The department's Air Pollution Control Program notified the MACC 
that a set of new population and employment forecasts was being received by MARC when 
available. Upon receipt of the forecast data necessary to calculate the impact of the 
employment and forecast changes, new mobile budgets may have to be developed. On 
September 24, 2002 MARC approved new employment and population forecasts. The 
forecasts impact to the projected area sources and projected mobile budgets was closely 
examined by interagency consultation group process and with the assistance of MARC. A 
new area inventory was developed for Kansas and Missouri and a new mobile emission 
budget was developed. MARC approved the New Mobile Emission Budget on October 29, 
2002. The new Mobile Budget was submitted for Public Hearing at the MACC meeting on 
October 24, 2002. The Mobile Budgets was approved by MACC on December 05, 2002 

1.2 KANSAS CITY OZONE MAINTENANCE PLAN 

COMPONENTS 

1.2.1 Administrative Requirements 

This section provides the legal authority statement, the public hearing notice along with the 
certification of public notice, the comments with the responses from Public Notice, and 
provides for the MACC Adoption Certification. 

1 .2.2 Demonstration of Continued Attainment 

This section of the Kansas City Maintenance Plan for Control of Ozone reveals by 
comparing updated emission inventory data, the Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and 
Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) emissions from 1999, and projections of the VOC and NOx 
emissions for the year 2012, that it is reasonable to conclude that the emission levels 
experienced in 1999 will not be exceeded in 2012. The analysis shows no increase in VOC 
and NOx emissions through the life of the maintenance plan. In 1991, the EPA approved the 
Kansas City Maintenance Plan by demonstrating the Ozone action levels in 1 989 that 
attained the NAAQS will remain below the action level through 2002. In a similar manner, 
the 2002 plan demonstrates the VOC and NOx levels in 1999 when projected to 2012 reveals 
no increase in VOC and NOx emissions. The 2002 Kansas City Maintenance Plan for 
Control of Ozone will allow the area to remain in compliance with NAAQS for the next ten 
years or the life of this plan. 

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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



The Plan shows that, without adding any new control measures to the KCMA, ozone 
precursor emissions will be reduced between 2000 and 2012. These reductions will be 
realised through a combination of already adopted State and Federal control measures and 
future federal programs affecting mobile sources, stationary sources, and transportation 
systems. The KCMA will meet the one-hour ozone standard through 2012 with the control 
measures listed in the Demonstration of Continued Attainment section. 

1 .2.3 Tracking Pl an' s Progress & Inventory Provision 

This section of the Kansas City Maintenance Plan for Control of Ozone is divided into 
sections that describe the ozone-monitoring network and provides for the required emission 
inventory update provisions. 

The primary tracking plan for the KCMA consists of continuous ozone monitoring. The 
ongoing regional transportation planning process carried out by the MARC, in coordination 
with the KDHE, the department's Air Pollution Control Program, and the EPA, will serve as 
a secondary means of tracking mobile source VOC and NOx precursor ozone emissions into 
the future. The region's transportation improvement programs are prepared every two years, 
and must go through a transportation conformity finding. This process will be used to 
periodically review progress toward meeting the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) and mobile 
source emissions projections in this maintenance plan. 

The locations of the six KCMA monitors are provided and the agency responsible for the 
individual monitors is disclosed. Table 1 is provided which reveals the number of 
exceedances during the ozone seasons from 1991 through 2001 . Table 2 presents the ozone 
exceedances by monitor in the KCMA for the years 1 982 through 2001 . Table 3 is a list of 
design values for the maintenance area. Design values are used as indicators of air quality. 
This section discusses the exact ozone monitor value that would be interpreted as an 
exceedance. In addition, this section discusses the history of missing monitor data, how 
missing monitor data is handled, and reveals sources of monitor down time. All recent 
missing monitor data occurrences qualified to be treated as discounted data or not counted as 
exceedances. 

An emission inventory is an itemized list of emission estimates for sources of air pollution 
in a given area, for a specified time period. The inventory is divided into stationary sources 
(point, area and biogenic) and mobile sources. The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program realizes the importance of a quality up-to-date emissions inventory in planning for 
air quality. Therefore, the department's Air Pollution Control Program commits to updating 
the emissions inventory to enable tracking of emission levels for the KCMA every three 
years for the next ten years or the life of this plan. This emissions inventory update will 
include point, area, mobile and biogenic emission revisions. 

1.2.4 Emission Inventory and Mobile Vehicle Budgets 

The base year for the new inventory is 1999. No violations of the one-hour ozone standard 
occurred during the 1998-1999 period. The region was in compliance with the one-hour 
ozone standard. 

The emission inventory update information is broken out into mobile on-road and off-road, 
area, point, and biogenic sources in Tables 4, 5, and 6. Table 4 is the total for the actual 1999 

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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



and projected 2012 emissions for the Missouri counties of the KCMA while Table 5 is the 
Total of the Kansas Counties of the KCMA. Table 6 is the combined Missouri and Kansas 
counties. A discussion of the mobile on-road and off-road emission data and the program 
used to estimate the emission data is provided. MARC, using the EPA MOBILE6 model for 
on-road modeling and Draft NONROAD model for off-road, developed the data for the on- 
road and off-road mobile emissions. The draft NONROAD model that was released in June 
2001 in support of the 2007 heavy-duty vehicle rule was used to generate 1999 and 2012 
emissions estimates for all off-road mobile source categories covered in the non-road model. 
A discussion of the biogenic data is provided which includes revealing the model used in the 
data development. This section contains general information about the emission data. The 
point and area sources calculation and source information is found in this section. 

The existing budgets for 2000 and 2010 were calculated in 1 995. In that exercise, the 1990 
level of emissions was assumed to keep the region in compliance with the one-hour ozone 
standard and was used as a cap on overall emissions through 2010. The 2010 level of 
emissions was less than the emissions in 1990, and the difference was quantified as a margin, 
which allowed for some growth in emissions from all sectors in 2010. Approximately one- 
third of the margin, which was the percent of overall emissions contributed by vehicles, was 
specifically allocated to motor vehicles. The motor vehicle emissions budget was the 
projected on-road mobile emissions in 2010 (assuming transportation investments through 
2010) plus the motor vehicle proportion of the margin (allowing for growth in mobile 
emissions). 

A plan revision submitted by the state in 1995 and approved by EPA (61 FR 18251 on 
April 25, 1996) establishes the current motor vehicle emissions budgets used to ensure that 
transportation plans conform to the ozone maintenance plan, see 40 CFR 52.1321(e). The 
budgets are shown in the following table: 

Motor Vehicle Emissions Budget (MVEB) for Conformity Purposes 

Compounds 2000 Attainment MVEB for the KCMA 

Non-methane hydrocarbons 87,548 kg/summer day (96.3 tpd) 

NOx 1 19,889 kg/summer day (131 .9 tpd) 

The mobile source budgets for 2012 are: 
VOC: 54.7 tons /ozone season day 
NOx: 97.8 tons /ozone season day 
This budget is expected to allow the area to maintain the one-hour ozone standard. 

12.5 Contingency Measures 

Section 175 A of the CAAA requires all maintenance plans to include such contingency 
commitments as needed to keep an area from exceeding the standard once attainment has 
been reached. The department's Air Pollution Control Program is obligated under the CAAA 
to set forth a plan to be implemented upon a violation of the ozone standard in the KCMA. 
The CAAA requires a group of specific control measures to be implemented in case of an 
ozone violation. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Contingency Measure Trigger for 2003 to 2004 

Violation occurs anywhere within the maintenance area. 
Statewide NOx rule (MO) 
Federal Non-road Engine Standards 

One or more of the following will be considered for implementation: 

Industrial emission offsets of 1 . 1 5 to 1 ; 

Stationary source controls for NOx and VOC; 

Stage II Vapor Recovery program at gasoline refueling stations; 

Enhanced vehicle emission reduction programs; 

Alternate fuel programs for fleet vehicle operations; 

Vehicle anti-tampering programs; 

Other transportation control measures; 

Vehicle inspection and maintenance program; 

VOC controls on minor sources; and 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program will further review and evaluate the 
current VOC rules to see if they need to be tightened, changed or modified. 

Contingency Measure Trigger for 2005-20 1 2 
Level I Trigger 

The KCMA NOx or VOC emissions inventories for 1999 increase more than 5% above the 
levels included in the 3-year emissions inventories updates. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program will work cooperatively with KS to 
evaluate the exceedances, or determine if adverse emissions trends are likely to continue. If 
so, the states will determine what and where controls may be required, as well as level of 
emissions reductions needed, to avoid a violation of the NAAQS. The study shall be 
completed within 9 months. If necessary, control measures shall be adopted within 1 8 
months of determination. 

Level H Trigger 

A violation of the Ozone NAAQS at any monitoring station in the KCMA. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program will work cooperatively with KS to 
conduct a thorough analysis to determine appropriate measures to address the cause of the 
violation. Analysis shall be completed within 6 months. Selected measures shall be adopted 
within 18 months and implemented as expeditiously as practicable, taking into consideration 
the ease of implementation and the technical and economic feasibility of selected measures. 

Point, Mobile and Area Control Measures 

Point Source Measures 

NOx SIP Call Phase II (non-utility). 

Reinstate requirements for Offsets aiid/or Lowest Achievable Emission Rate (LAER). 

Apply Reasonably Available Control Technology (RACT) measures to smaller existing 
sources. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Other control measures to be identified. 
Mobile Source Measures 

Tier 2 Vehicle Standards and Low Sulfur Fuel 

Heavy Duty Diesel Standards and Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel 

TCM's, including, but not limited to, area-wide rideshare programs, telecommuting, transit 
improvements, and traffic flow improvements. 

Vehicle testing I/M (OBDII) 

California Engine Standards 

Other measures to be identified 

Area Source Measures 

California Architectural/Industrial Maintenance (AIM) 

California Commercial and Consumer Products 

Broader geographic applicability of existing measures 

California Off-road Engine Standards 

Other measures to be identified 

1 .2.6 Provision for Operation of Monitoring Network 

This section outlines actions to upgrade the monitoring network. Moving of the Worlds of 
Fun monitor to Rocky Creek, the new Leavenworth County monitor and the pending 
construction of Johnson County monitor is mentioned. Reference is made to commitment 
letters from the department's Air Pollution Control Program to the EPA and acceptances by 
the EPA of the commitment letter. A commitment to operate the monitoring network for ten 
years or the life of the plan is found in this section. 

1.2.7 Conformity 

A general conformity regulation (10 CSR 10-6.300 Conformity of General Federal Actions 
to State Implementation Plans) became effective on September 30, 1996. This rule 
implements section 176(c) of the CAA, as amended (42U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and regulations 
under 40 CFR part 51 Subpart W. Under those authorities, no department, agency, or 
instrumentality of the Federal Government shall engage in or approve any activity that does 
not conform to an applicable implementation plan. This applies to areas in Missouri that are 
designated as a nonattainment or maintenance area for any criteria pollutant of NAAQS. 

A conformity analysis (see List of References # 7) is a demonstration that the regional 
emissions from proposed transportation projects would not exceed the motor vehicle 
emissions budgets. If the conformity requirements cannot be met, then only certain types of 
projects may proceed until the requirements can be met. The conformity analysis clearly 
indicates that regional motor vehicle emissions of VOC and NOx remain below the budgeted 
level in the proposed regional plan while accounting for the network anticipated to be 
operational as a result of roadway capacity projects listed in the 2002 Transportation 



15 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

Improvement Plan (TIP). As such, the analysis indicates that the 2002 TIP and the 2020 
LRTP are in conformity with the plan. 



16 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2.0 THE 2002 KANSAS CITY OZONE 

MAINTENANCE PLAN 

2.1 ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS 

2.1.1 Legal Authority 

The Missouri Air Conservation Commission is granted legal authority to develop and 
implement regulations regarding air pollution under section 643.050 of the Revised Statutes 
of Missouri. 

2.1 .2 Public Hearing Notice and Certification 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program is required to announce a public hearing, 
at least 30 days prior to holding such hearing. This was accomplished by announcements 
submitted to newspapers at least 30 days prior to the public hearing which occurred on June 
28, 2002. Attached in Appendix F is the public hearing notice along with certification of 
publication of the public notice for the entire Maintenance Plan. Attached in Appendix J is 
the public hearing notice along with certification of publication of the public notice for the 
revision of the Mobile Budgets from the new forecasts . 

2.1.3 Comments, Responses, and Explanations of Change 

Attached in Appendix G are the department's Air Pollution Control Program's responses 
to comments received during the open public comment period on this plan. The comment 
period was open until seven days after the Public Hearing that occurred on June 28, 2002. 
The department's Air Pollution Control Program is required to respond to all comments 
received. Attached in Appendix K is the comments and responses on the revised budget. 

2.1 .4 MACC Adoption Certification 

Attached in Appendix H is the MACC adoption certification to demonstrate approval by 
the commission of the entire Maintenance plan. Attached in Appendix L is the MACC 
adoption certificate for the revised Budgets and inventory. Attached in Appendix M is the 
final EPA approval of 2002 Kansas City Maintenance Plan. 



17 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2.2 DEMONSTRATION OF CONTINUED ATTAINMENT 
2.2.1 Demonstration of Decreasing Inventory Values 

The area wide VOC emissions inventory for 1989 that attained the NAAQS standard for 
ozone, less a margin for safety, is 236,872 kg/day (260.6 tons per day). In 2000, the area 
wide VOC emissions were projected to be 186,557 kg/day (205.2 tons per day), a decrease of 
50,3 1 5 kg/day (55.4 tons per day). Given the margin, the EPA concluded that VOC 
emissions will remain below the action level through the year 2002. 

In 1999, the area wide VOC emissions were 253.6 tons per ozone season day (osd). In 
2012, emissions are projected to be 221 .7 tons per osd (biogenic emissions not counted). The 
projection of the 2012 maintenance plan emissions demonstrates the area will maintain the 
ozone standard for the next ten years, i.e. through 2012. However, some parts of the country 
show increases in ozone levels over the last ten years, due largely to increased NOx emissions 
and weather conditions favorable to ozone formation according to the National Air Quality 
and Emissions Trends Report in 1999. These increases appear to be explained by weather 
conditions more conducive to ozone formation (i.e., higher summer temperatures and drier 
conditions) in 1999 relative to 1990 paired with increased NOx emissions in many of the 
affected states. NOx are emitted from motor vehicles, power plants, and other sources of 
combustion and natural sources including lightening and biological process in soil. 

VOC emissions will remain below the action level for the next ten years. NOx emissions 
levels are reviewed to provide more assurance for remaining in compliance. Since increases 
in NOx emissions and the associated changes in atmospheric chemistry could result in 
violations of the ozone standard. The 1999 NOx emissions are 424.2 tons per ozone day and 
the projected 2012 NOx emissions are 373.5 tons per ozone day. The analysis shows no 
increase in NOx emissions through the life of the maintenance plan. Therefore, with VOC 
emissions below the action level and with NOx emissions not increasing, the area will be in 
attainment for the next ten years. 

2.2.2 Control Measures 

The Plan shows, without adding any new control measures to the KCMA, ozone precursor 
emissions will be reduced between 2000 and 2012. These reductions will be realized through 
a combination of already adopted control measures and programs affecting mobile sources, 
stationary sources, and transportation systems. The KCMA will rely on the State and Federal 
control measures and programs contained in the plan to demonstrate maintenance of the one- 
hour ozone standard through 2012. These control measures and programs are listed below: 

2.2.2.1 Department's Air Pollution Control Program Control 
Measures 

Reference for Code of State Regulations Title of State Regulation 

10 CSR 10-2.040 Maximum Allowable Emission of Particulate 

Matter From Fuel Burning Equipment Used for 
Indirect Heating 



18 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Reference for Code of State Regulations Title of State Regulation 

10 CSR 10-2.080* Emission of Visible Air Contaminants From 

Internal Combustion Engines. 

1 CSR 1 0-2.090** ' Incinerators 

1 CSR 10-2.1 00 Open Burning Restrictions 

1 CSR 10-2.1 50 Time Schedule for Compliance 

10 CSR 10-2.205 Control of Emissions From Aerospace 

Manufacture and Rework Facilities 

10 CSR 10-2.210 Control of Emissions from Solvent Metal 

Cleaning 

10 CSR 10-2.215 Control of Emissions from Solvent Cleanup 

Operations 

1 CSR 1 0-2.220 Liquefied Cutback Asphalt Paving Restricted 

10 CSR 10-2.230 Control of Emissions From Industrial Surface 

Coating Operations 

10 CSR 10-2.260 Control of Petroleum Liquid Storage, Loading, 

and Transfer 

10 CSR 10-2.280 Control of Emissions From Perchloroethylene 

Dry Cleaning Installations 

10 CSR 10-2.290 Control of Emissions From Rotogravure and 

Flexographic Printing Facilities 

10 CSR 10-2.300 Control of Emissions From the Manufacturing 

of Paints, Varnishes, Lacquers, Enamels and 
Other Allied Surface Coating Products 

1 CSR 1 0-2.3 1 Control of Emissions From the Application of 

Underbody Deadeners 

1 CSR 1 0-2.320 Control of Emissions From the Production of 

Pesticides and Herbicides 

1 CSR 1 0-2.330 Control of Gasoline Reid Vapor Pressure 

10 CSR 10-2.340 Control of Emissions From Lithographic 

Printing Facilities 

10 CSR 10-2.360 Control of Emissions From Bakery Ovens. 

10 CSR 10-2.390 Conformity to State or Federal Implementation 

Plans of Transportation Plans, Programs, and 
Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under 
Title 23 U.S.C. or the Federal Transit Laws 

*In process of being rescinded from State regulations and replaced with 10 CSR1 0-6.220. 

**Rescinded from State regulations in 1991, but still in SIP. 



19 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2.2.2.2 Federal Control Measures 

This list contains the Federal motor vehicle emissions control measures that were in effect 
as of May 22, 2002, the date of the Public Notice and which were relied on in the mobile 
emissions projection calculations using MOBILE6. 

Tier 1 

Heavy Duty Diesel rule starting mid-year 1991 

National Low Emission Vehicles (mid-year- 1997 for New England States and mid-year 
2001 for USA) 

Onboard Refueling Vapor Recovery (ORVR) (phase in with 40% of mid-year- 1998) 
Tier II 

Heavy Duty Diesel rule starting with mid-year 2004 
Heavy Duty Diesel rule starting with mid-year 2007 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program will maintain all of the control measures 
listed in this section to ensure maintenance of the one-hour ozone NAAQS. Revisions to the 
control measures included in the maintenance plan will be submitted to the EPA for inclusion 
in the Missouri State Implementation Plan. The revisions will be accompanied with 
documentation showing that such a change will not interfere with maintenance of the 
NAAQS. The department's Air Pollution Control Program has the necessary resources to 
enforce any violation of its rules or permit provisions and intends to continue enforcing all 
rules or permit provisions that relate to the emission of ozone precursors in the KCMA. 

2.3 TRACKING PLAN'S PROGRESS & INVENTORY 

PROVISION 

2.3.1 Tracking the Plan's Progress 
2.3.1.1 Tracking Methods 

The primary tracking plan for the KCMA consists of continuous ozone monitoring. The 
ongoing regional transportation planning process carried out by the MARC, in coordination 
with the KDHE, the department's Air Pollution Control Program, and EPA, will serve as 
another means of tracking mobile source VOC and NOx precursor emissions into the future. 
Since revisions to the region's transportation improvement programs are prepared every two 
years, and must go through a transportation conformity finding, this process will be used to 
periodically review progress toward meeting the VMT and mobile source emissions 
projections in this maintenance plan. 

Specifically, the Kansas City ozone-monitoring network consists of six monitors. Two 
monitors, in Liberty and Watkins Mill Park, are placed downwind, assuming winds are 
predominantly from the southwest, to record peak afternoon readings. Two monitors are 
placed in populated areas, at Rocky Creek (previously located at Worlds of Fun) and Kansas 



20 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



City International Airport (KCI). One monitor is placed upwind, at Richards Gebaur Air 
Force Base (AFB), to monitor ozone transport from outside the area. The final monitor is in 
downtown Kansas City, Kansas, in Wyandotte County. 

The Kansas City Missouri Health Department maintains the monitors at Rocky Creek and 
KCI. The department's Air Pollution Control Program operates the Liberty and Watkins Mill 
Park monitors. The monitor in Kansas City, Kansas is operated by the Wyandotte County 
Department of Air Quality. The monitor at Worlds of Fun was moved to a new site called 
Rocky Creek early 2002. It is now located at 13131 NE 169th Highway, Kansas City, MO 
64141- Clay County. 

2.3.1.2 Ambient Am Monitoring 

The Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977 established the NAAQS for ozone as 0.12 parts 
per million (ppm). A single monitor is allowed to experience an average of one exceedance 
of the standard each year over a three-year period. The fourth exceedance in a three-year 
period is considered a violation of the ozone standard. An ozone reading of higher than 
0.125 ppm is considered an exceedance as it is rounded to 0.13 ppm. It is a 
misunderstanding to consider a value of 0. 124 ppm as an exceedance for it is not interpreted 
as an exceedance. Because the standard is 0.12 ppm 5 a value must be 0.125 or higher in 
order to be counted as an exceedance. This is due to the rounding convention of the 
standard. It is important to understand the rounding convention when evaluating the data. 
Upon reviewing the data that generated Table 2, it was common to see values between 0.12 
and 0.124 that are not counted as exceedances because of the rounding convention. 

The number of ozone exceedances during the ozone seasons from 1991 through 2001 is 
listed in Table 1 . The numbers of exceedances are reported by monitor. All exceedances 
must come from the same monitor; exceedances are not summed across monitors. The states 
of Kansas and Missouri along with the EPA conducted a monitoring network review during 
2000. The department's Air Pollution Control Program has made recommendations to 
change the monitoring network to relocate and add monitors. These changes to the network 
are intended to allow for enhanced regional location and diverse meteorological condition 
coverage. 

The KCMA has experienced seven exceedances of the ozone standard since 1997. Five of 
these exceedances occurred in 1998. The Liberty site had two exceedances and Watkins Mill 
Park sites (Lawson) experienced one exceedance in 1998. The Wyandotte site in Kansas 
registered two exceedances and the KCI Airport site had one exceedance in 1998. The KCI 
Airport and the Richards Gebaur AFB monitors each experienced an exceedance during the 
2000 ozone season. During 1 999 and 2001 , none of the monitoring sites in the maintenance 
plan area recorded exceedances of the NAAQS. 

The value of the exceedances for the time period 1982 to 2001, from the first highest to the 
fourth highest exceedance for each year, are found in Table 2. The exceedances range from 
0.13 to 0.17 ppm, with the majority being in the 0.13 to 0.14 range. 



21 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Table 1 Ozone Exceedances by Year in KC Maintenance Area 




Liberty-Hwy 33 and County Hwy 



Lawson-Watkins Mill State Park. Road 



Kansas City-49 and Winchester 
Worlds of Fun 



Kansas City-Richards Gebaur AFB 



Kansas City-1 1500 N. 71 Hwy 
Kansas City International Airport 




The monitor at Liberty has historically been the source of violations. This monitoring site 
recorded violations in the three-year periods 1982 through 1985, 1983 through 1986, 1986 
through 1988, 1993 through 1995 and 1995 through 1997. The Worlds of Fun monitoring 
site experienced a violation in the monitoring period from 1986 through 1988. 



22 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Tab 



e 2 Ozone Exceedances by Monitor in the KCMA 



Monitor Location 


Year 


1 st High 


2 nd High 


3 rd High 


4 th Hieh 


Total 


Richards Gebaur 


1 QOO 

1 yoZ 




























(Jackson County) 


1 QQA 


U.l 3 T 








1 



















iy oo 










A 




1^0 / 










A 






1 ooo 

i yoo 










A 














A 

u 




1 oon 
Lyyv) 










A, 




1 001 


AIT 








1 




lyyZ 










A 






1 QQT 

1 yyj 










A 




1 774 










A 
U 




1995 















i yyv 










u 




1997 













Richards Gebaur 


1998 













South 


1999 













(Jackson County) 


2000 










1 




2001 


0.15 












♦Parts Per Million 



Monitor Location 


Year 


1 st High 


2 nd 
High 


S^High 


4 th High 


Total 


County Home 


1982 













Road 


1983 


0.14* 


0.13 


0.13 




3 


Liberty, MO 


1984 


0.17 


0.14 


0.14 




3 


(Clay County) 


1985 
1986 
1987 


0.13 









1 





1988 


0.15 


0.15 


0.13 




3 




1989 















1990 















1991 















1992 















1993 


0.13 








1 




1994 















1995 


0.16 


0.13 


0.13 




3 




1996 















1997 


0.13 








1 




1998 


0.14 


0.13 






2 




1999 















2000 















2001 














23 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Table 2 Ozone Exceedances by Monitor in the KCMA (c ont.) 



Monitor Location 


I Col 


i xiign 


z xiign 


j Align 


4 th ITicrh 


Total 


Watkins Mill 


1982 













Park 


1983 













(Clay County) 


1984 


0.16* 


0.13 


0.13 




3 




1985 















1986 















1987 















1988 


0.17 


0.15 


0.14 




3 




1989 















1990 















1991 















1992 















1993 















1994 















1995 


0.16 


0.13 


A 1 ^ 

0.13 




3 




1996 















1997 















1998 


0.13 








1 




1999 















2000 















2001 













*Parts Per Million 


Monitor Location 


Year 


I* High 


2 nil High 


3 rd High 


4 th High 
















Total 


Worlds of Fun 


1982 













Kansas City, 


1983 













MO 


1984 













(Clay County) 


1985 















1986 


0.13* 


0.13 






2 




1987 


0.13 








1 




1988 


0.14 


0.13 






2 




1989 















1990 


0.13 








1 




1991 















1992 















1993 















1994 















1995 


0.13 


0.13 






2 




1996 















1997 















1998 















1999 















2000 















2001 














24 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Table 2 Ozone Exceedances by Monitor in the KCMA (cont) 



Monitor Location 


Year 


l^Hioh 

J. JTLlgXl 


2 nd Hitrh 


3 rd Hi oh 


4 th Hi ah 


Total 


vr^ t • TIT- 

K.C international Airport 


i no 













rvarisas v^uy, iviu 












U 


/"P 1 otto f~^/~\i ir-»t-v A 


1 QQA 


v. 13 


All 






1 


































lyo / 















i noo 










u 




iyoy 










a 




1 QOA 

iyyu 


U.14 








1 




1 QQ1 










A 

u 




1 ooo 

1 yyz 










A 

u 




lyyj 










A 
(J 




1 QQ/l 










u 






1 3 

v.l J 








1 

1 




1996 















1997 


0.13 








1 




1998 


0.13 








1 




1999 















2000 


0.13 








1 




2001 














*Parts Per Million 



Monitor Location 


Year 


1 st High 


2 nd High 


3 rd High 


4 th High 


Total 


619 Ann Ave. 


1982 













Kansas City, KS 


1983 


0.13* 








1 


(Wyandotte County) 


1984 
1985 
















1986 


0.15 


0.14 






2 




1987 


0.13 








1 




1988 















1989 


0.14 








1 




1990 















1991 















1992 















1993 


0.13 








1 




1994 















1995 















1996 


0.13 








1 




1997 















1998 


0.14 








1 




1999 















2000 















2001 














25 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Table 2 Ozone Exceedances by Monitor in the KCMA (cont.) 



Monitor 
Location 


Year 


T'High 


2 nd High 


3 rd High 


4 th High 


Total 


Total 


1982 













Monitors 


1983 










4 




1984 










9 




1985 















1986 










5 




1987 










2 




1988 










8 




1989 










1 




1990 










2 




1991 










1 




1992 










1 




1993 










2 




1994 















1995 










9 




1996 










1 




1997 










2 




1998 










5 




1999 















2000 










2 




2001 














Design values are used as indicators of air quality. The higher the design value implies 
poorer the air quality. Each monitor in the Kansas City area has a design value and the entire 
KCMA has a design value. A monitor's design value is defined as the ozone concentration 
that would only be expected to be exceeded once per year on average over a three-year 
period. A monitor's design value is the "fourth highest ozone concentration value" recorded 
in the past three years. The design value is an indicator of the expected ozone value for the 
area. This design value is not determined based on any other monitor's "fourth highest ozone 
concentration value." 

The design value for the maintenance area is the maximum "fourth highest ozone 
concentration value" of all the individual monitors for the maintenance area. The 
maintenance area's design value is the highest individual monitor design value for each 
three- year monitor period. Attainment or nonattainment status is determined by the 
individual air monitor with the highest design value for a three-year period. If the individual 
air monitor site has no more than one exceedance per year on average, it has attained the 
NAAQS for ozone. Note that a site exceeds the NAAQS if its fourth highest value is at least 
125 parts per billion (ppb), which is the effective level of the standard. Section 1 81 of the 
Clean Air Act Amendments describes the areas designated as nonattainment for ozone. They 
are classified as marginal, moderate, serious, severe, and extreme, based on area design 
values. From 1 996 through September 30, 2001 , the design values were below the value 
established in the amendments to the CAA for classifying the area as marginal nonattainment 
area. Table 3 contains a listing of the design values for the KCMA for the time periods from 
1982 through 2001. 



26 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Table 3 Ozone Design Values for the KCM A 



3-Year Time Period 


Maintenance Area Design Value) 


1982 through 1984 


14* 

U. J. *+ 


1983 through 1 985 




1984 through 1986 




1985 through 1987 


1? 


1986 through 1988 


U.i J 


1987 through 1989 

L S \j f L.LLL W LI liJ_L X y KJy 


1 ? 


1988 through 1990 

1 UU LJLJJ. WLlc^li 1 y y\J 


1? 


1989 through 1991 

i. y \j y vxxx * fy. x y y x 


1 1 

v. J. 1 


1 990 through 1 992 

xyy\j lj.u. L4. tr^ 1 1 y y y a* 


1 1 

\J. X 1 


1991 through 1993 


1 1 


1992 through 1994 

a. y y x~ ulxx v_/ vt&i i x y y »^ 


1 1 

\J . X 1 


1993 through 1995 


0.13 


1994 through 1996 


0.12 


1995 through 1997 


0.13 


1996 through 1998 


0.12 


1997 through 1999 


0.12 


1998 through 2000 


0.12 


1999 through 2001 


0.12 



(* In Parts Per Million) 

2.3.7.3 Expected Exceedances/Missing Data 

In addition to recorded exceedances, a region is allowed an average of one expected 
exceedance per year over a three-year period. An expected exceedance can occur when a 
monitor has missing data. Missing data is the result from a malfunction at a monitor, 
incorrect calibration standards, or acts of nature. 

The EPA will look at the day prior to the missing data and the day following to determine 
if the highest recorded ozone reading for each day is 75% of the ozone standard. If both days 
meet the 75% test then the "missing" data can be discounted. 

The KCMA has had "missing" data problems twice in recent history. The Liberty 
monitoring site experienced a period of 32 days in 1988, and the Worlds of Fun monitoring 
site missed 45 days in 1990. In both cases, the EPA was able to discount the episode as a 
violation of the standard through additional analysis. The KCMA has not experienced any 
extended period of "missing" data since the 1990 episode, but Kansas City has had 
equipment malfunctions the last two years that resulted in extended (longer than one day) 
periods of no data. In all cases, the missing data was discounted. 

2.3.2 Provision for Emission Inventory Updates 

An emission inventory is an itemized list of emission estimates for sources of air pollution 
in a given area, for a specified time period. The inventory is divided into stationary sources 
(point, area and biogenic) and mobile sources. The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program realizes the importance of a quality up-to-date emissions inventory in planning for 
air quality. Therefore, the department's Air Pollution Control Program commits to updating 
the emissions inventory to enable tracking of emission levels for the KCMA every three 



27 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



years for the next ten years or the life of this plan. This emissions inventory update will 
include point, area, mobile and biogenic emission revisions. 

2A EMISSION INVENTORY AND MOTOR VEHICLE 

BUDGETS 

2.4.1 Emission Inventory 

The base year for the new inventory is 1999. No violations of the one-hour ozone standard 
occurred during the 1 998-1 999 period. The region was in compliance with the one-hour 
ozone standard. 

An ozone emissions inventory was prepared for the KCMA for calendar year 1999. The 
inventory addresses emissions of VOC, NOx, and carbon monoxide (CO) from point, area, 
on-road mobile, and off-road mobile sources. VOC emissions from biogenic sources are also 
addressed. The complete KCMA inventory includes emissions from Johnson and Wyandotte 
counties in Kansas and Clay, Jackson, and Platte counties in Missouri. This report covers the 
Missouri counties in the KCMA only. 

The objectives of the inventory are to support the revision of the KCMA maintenance plan 
as required by CAA Section 175A(b) and to provide emissions data for transportation 
planning in the KCMA. In addition, the inventory may be used in future regional ozone 
modeling applications. 

Emissions were also projected to year 2012 to provide the basis for establishing new motor 
vehicle emissions budgets. 1999 emissions are reported as actual annual emissions in tons 
per year and actual summer weekday emissions in pounds or tons per osd. Projected 
emissions are reported as pounds per osd or tons per osd. 

The 1999 KCMA emissions inventory was a cooperative effort among MARC, KDHE, the 
department's Air Pollution Control Program, and EPA Region VII. MARC coordinated the 
effort and developed the on-road and off-road mobile source emissions estimates for the five- 
county area. The department's Air Pollution Control Program developed the point, area, and 
biogenic source emissions estimates for Clay, Jackson, and Platte counties (See Appendix C). 
KDHE prepared the point, area, and biogenic source emissions estimates for Johnson and 
Wyandotte counties. KDHE also developed locomotive emissions estimates for the two 
Kansas counties. EPA Region VII drafted the inventory preparation plan. 

The ozone season daily emissions are presented in tons per osd because of the magnitude 
of the numbers; elsewhere in this document, ozone season day emissions are in units of 
pounds per osd. An emission inventory lists all sources of specific air pollutants in a given 
area and the amount of each source emits. The two main or most important pollutants that 
lead to the formation of ground-level ozone are VOC and NOx. An Ozone emissions 
inventory was prepared for the KCMA for calendar year 1999. The inventory addresses 
emissions of VOC, NOx and CO from point, area, on-road mobile and off-road mobile 
sources. 

Area sources are small, stationary sources that do not emit large amounts of pollution but 
are very numerous. Examples include dry cleaners, printers, bakeries, and automobile 



28 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



painting and repair shops. Consumers that consume household items that contain VOC and 
NOx are an area source. 

Point sources are large industrial pollution emitters and power plants. On-road mobile 
sources include cars and light trucks, as- well as medium and heavy-duty commercial trucks. 
Off-road mobile sources include aircraft, railroad locomotives, watercraft, construction, and 
agricultural equipment. 

VOC emissions from biogenic sources are also addressed. The complete KCMA inventory 
includes emissions from Johnson and Wyandotte counties in Kansas and Clay, Jackson and 
Platte counties in Missouri. 

The 1 999 emissions are reported as actual annual emissions in tons per year and actual 
summer weekday emissions in pounds per OSD. 2012 emissions projections are reported as 
pounds per osd. EPA Region VII drafted the inventory preparation plan. 



Table 4 1999 and 2012 VOC, NOx & CO Emissions for MO 



Source of 


1999 Daily Emissions (tons/osd) 


20 1 2 Daily Emissions (tons/osd) 


Emissions 

On-road Mobile* 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


Off-road Mobile 


21.6 


54.9 


286.4 


12.9 


45.5 


354.5 


Biogenic 


73.05 






73.05 






Area 


43.1 


13.0 


5.3 


54.3 


13.8 


5.5 


Point 


15.9 


107.2 


9.7 


24.6 


148.2 


14.0 


Total 


153.65 


175.1 


301.4 


164.85 


207.5 


374.0 



* Due to model limitations, on-road mobile emissions are not broken out into individual counties for 1999 and 



2012. 



Table 5 1999 and 2012 VOC, NOx & CO Emissions for KS 



Source of 


1999 Daily Emissions (Tons/osd) 


2012 Daily Emissions (Tons/osd) 


Emissions 
On-road Mobile* 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


Off-road Mobile 


21.4 


54.0 


288.0 


11.8 


40.5 


357.3 


Biogenic 


40.8 












Area 


46.8 


10.3 


19.6 


57.9 


12.2 


22.2 


Point 


12.3 


31.9 


4.6 


14.8 


39.0 


5.3 


Total 


121.3 


96.2 


312.2 


84.5 


91.7 


384.8 



* Due to model limitations, on-road mobile emissions are not broken out into individual counties for 1999 and 



2012. 



29 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Table 6 1999 and 2012 VOC, NOx & CO Emissions for KCMA 



Source of 


1999 Daily Emissions (Tons/OSD) 


2012 Daily Emissions 




Emissions 








(Tons/OSD; 


) 






VOC 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


On-road Mobile* 






1 09? 4 


45 5 


74 2 


579.0 


Off-road Mobile 


43.0 


108.9 


574.4 


24.7 


86.0 


711.8 


Biogenic 


113.85 






113.85 






Area 


89.9 


23.3 


24.9 


112.1 


26.0 


27.7 


Point 


28.3 


139.1 


14.3 


39.4 


187.2 


19.3 


Total 


. 367.35 


424.2 


1706.0 


335.55 


373.4 


1337.8 



2. 4. 1. 1 Mobile So urce Emissions 

On January 29, 2002, the EPA released the MOBDLE6 motor vehicle emissions model. 
EPA guidance issued along with the model grants a two-year grace period before use of the 
MOBILE6 model is required in the State Implementation Plan development. The 2002 
revision of the Kansas City Maintenance Plan used MOBILE6 in the development of the 
mobile budgets in the plan. The 2002 revision of the Kansas City Maintenance Plan did not 
use MOBILES and MOBILE5B to develop the budgets or for any projection of mobile 
emissions. The two-year grace period does not apply to this plan as only MOBILE6 was 
used in the development of the Kansas City Maintenance Plan. Appendix D contains the 
parameters chosen for operation of MOBILE6 and for the calculation of emission 
projections. The MOBILE6 inputs are: default vehicle age distribution; 7.2 RVP fuel 
assumed in 1999; 7.0 RVP fuel assumed in 2012; refueling emissions not included 
(inventoried separately as area source). The draft NONROAD model that was released in 
June 2001 in support of the 2007 heavy-duty vehicle rule was used to generate 1 999 and 
2012 emissions estimates for all off-road mobile source categories covered in the non-road 
model. 

The CAAA mandated the EPA to study and regulate emissions from off-road mobile 
sources. Section 213(a) of the CAAA required the EPA to conduct a study to determine if 
emissions from off-road engines and vehicles cause or significantly contribute to air 
pollution. The non-road study was completed in 1991 . The EPA constructed two sets of 
emissions inventories for the entire country and for 19 ozone non-attainment areas and for 16 
carbon monoxide non-attainment areas. The local areas were selected to represent a variety 
of demographic and geographic regions, as well as the major air pollution problems in the 
nation. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2. 4. L2 Biogenic Emissions 

Biogenic sources are those of natural sources which result from some sort of biological 
activity. Vegetation such as forest plants, urban trees, shrubs, agricultural crops, and other 
plants is the predominant, biological activity of VOC. These biogenic emissions are emitted 
as the plant transpires, mostly during the daylight hours. 

In the past, the impacts of biogenic VOC were not considered when ozone control 
strategies to limit emissions of either NOx or VOC were developed. However, the 
importance of biogenic VOC emissions in an ozone inventory became apparent in some 
regions when the biogenic VOC emission estimates were compared to the anthropogenic 
VOC emission estimates (Chameides et al., 1988). 

Biogenic emission estimates for the United States have been reported at 30,860,000 tons of 
VOC per year and 346,000 tons of NOx per year (Novak et al., 1993). This is in comparison 
to estimates of 21,090,000 tons of anthropogenic VOC and 23,550,000 tons of anthropogenic 
NOx , estimated for 1990 (EPA, 1994). Isoprene, one of the major constituents of biogenic 
emissions, is very photoreactive, making biogenic emissions an even more important source 
of VOC. Because of the interaction between NOx and VOC in terms of atmospheric ozone 
levels, biogenic emissions should be included in any inventory, which will be used to predict 
or to monitor atmospheric ozone levels. Inclusion of biogenic emissions is essential for 
photochemical air quality modeling. 

The Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS-2) is the preferred method for air quality 
models using biogenic estimates, because it is the most scientifically advanced model for 
estimating biogenic ozone precursors. It can be used with several air quality models, and it 
estimates emissions of soil NOx, which can be an important source in many rural areas. The 
Personal Computer version Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (PCBEIS2.2) is the 
preferred method when an emission estimate is needed for reporting purposes only. The 
Biogenic Model for Emissions (BIOME) model, the collection of local data for use in any of 
these models, and BEIS, the precursor of BEIS-2, are alternative methods. 

The Personal Computer version of the Biogenic Emissions Inventory System (BEIS 2.3) 
allows users to estimate hourly emissions of biogenic VOC and soil NOx emissions for any 
county in the contiguous United States. This system was developed by EPA Office of 
Research and Development via collaboration between the National Risk Management 
Research Laboratory, Emissions and Modeling Branch and the National Exposure Research 
Laboratory, Atmospheric Modeling Division. BEIS 2.3 has been written in C-H-/JAVA to 
allow better operability with current PC operating systems and to take advantage of more 
recent approaches in object-oriented programming. BEIS 2.3 uses the same emission factors 
and land use data as PCBEIS 2.2 and should produce very similar results. 

Meteorological data for air temperature and cloud cover was incorporated specifically for 
the Kansas City area covering Jackson County. The biogenic emissions for the Kansas 
counties in the KCMA are 40.8 tons per ozone season day. The biogenic emissions for the 
Missouri counties in the KCMA are 73.05 tons per ozone season day. Combined, all 
counties in the KCMA have total biogenic emissions of 1 13.05 tons per ozone season day. 
(See Tables 4, 5 and 6) 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2. 4. 1.3 Area Source Emissions 

The area source inventory (see Appendix B and C) is reported in terms of VOC emissions 
for the Missouri Counties in the KCMA, the Kansas Counties in the KCMA, and the entire 
KCMA. These totals are shown in tables 4 and 5, and 6 respectively. 

The area source inventory includes small point sources, those sources with less than ten 
tons of actual emissions, as well as sources not reported in the point source description. 
Examples of sources included in the area source emissions include, but are not limited to: 
printing presses, dry cleaning facilities, degreasing operations, incinerators, and painting 
operations. The individual area source categories are compared to their respective point 
source categories to eliminate double counting of VOC emissions. 

The area source inventory was prepared using 1999 as a base year. The 1999 inventory 
was evaluated for rule effectiveness using the criteria outlined by the EPA. The area source 
categories included in this inventory were identified based on a review of the previous area 
source inventory done for the region and judgement based on knowledge of population and 
types of emissions sources in Johnson and Wyandotte counties (see reference 1). EPA 
guidance regarding the expected magnitude of VOC, NOx, and CO emissions from area 
source categories was also considered (see reference 2). The area source categories expected 
to emit the most significant amounts of VOC, NOx, and CO were given the highest priority 
in this inventory. 

For many of the area source categories, emissions estimation methodologies outlined in the 
Emissions Inventory Improvement Program (EIIP) documents were followed. In some cases, 
a methodology given in the EIIP was impractical due to the quality of data available or the 
level of effort required for data collection. An alternate methodology was then chosen or 
developed based on the available data. 

Because some area source methodologies estimate emissions from all sources within the 
category, emissions already listed in the point source inventory may be double-counted. In 
the development of the area source inventory for Johnson and Wyandotte counties, emissions 
from point sources were subtracted from the area source emissions where it could be 
determined that the two inventories overlapped (see Appendix B). 

Emissions estimates for several of the area source categories were calculated using 
population as a surrogate for activity. The 1999 population estimates were obtained from the 
U.S. Census Bureau (see reference 3). The 2000 and 2012 population forecasts are from 
MARC policy-based, long-range population forecasts (see reference 4). Since the MARC 
forecast is done in ten-year increments, the 2012 forecast was interpolated from the 2010 and 
2020 forecasts. In cases where population was used as a basis for the emissions projections, 
the forecast for calendar year 2000 was used as the base year because it is the base year of 
MARC population forecast. 

2.4.1.4 Point Source Emissions 

Point source emissions are collected each year, in Missouri, via the Emission Inventory 
Questionnaire (EIQ). All facilities in Missouri that have the potential to emit more than 40 
tons of VOC per year are required to submit an EIQ. Facilities with less than 10 tons of 
actual VOC emissions per year are included in the area source inventory. 



32 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Missouri's portion of the 1999 point source inventory for the KCMA includes Jackson 
County, Platte County, and Clay County (see Appendix C). The report in Appendix C 
includes CO, NOx, and VOC emissions from point sources in the three county areas as 
reported by the facility. The inventory data was obtained from the EIQs. EIQs are submitted 
on an annual basis by point sources to report air pollutant emissions from processes within 
the facility. The completed EIQs are submitted to the Kansas City Health Department or the 
department's Air Pollution Control Program depending on location. The department's Air 
Pollution Control Program compiles the local data and the submitted data into a database. 
The department's Air Pollution Control Program performs the overall quality 
assurance/quality compliance. 

The Missouri portion of the KCMA inventory consists of point sources that emitted VOC, 
NOx, and CO in the three county areas. The data was obtained from the department's Air 
Pollution Control Program Emission Inventory System (moeis) database. The information in 
Appendix C is based on the EIQ information data entered into the department's Air Pollution 
Control Program's database, including the EIQs submitted to the Kansas City Health 
Department. 

2.4.1.4.1 APCP Point Source Emissions Calculation Method 

The actual annual emissions reported were used to calculate an ozone season daily 
emission rated based on the percentage of operating time during the summer months of June 
through August. The following equation was used: 

1999 osd emissions = (1999 annual emissions) x (2,000 lbs/1 ton) x (Summer operating 
%/Days of operation) 

Emissions projections for calendar year 2012 wiere perfonned using the Department of 
Commerce's Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) growth factors. BEA factors were 
derived for each Source Classification Code (SCC) and county combination using EPA 
Economic Growth Analysis System (EGAS) v4.0 software. Growth of emissions was 
normalized to the 1 999 inventory base year because EGAS v4.0 has a base year of 1996. 
The following equation was used for the emissions projections: 

2012 osd emissions = (1999 osd emissions) x (2012 growth factor/1999 growth factor) 

Below is an example calculation showing the manner in which the 1999 NOx Emissions 
are calculated for a Point Source. This example is for a Missouri facility that emitted 8.259 
tons of NOx in 1999. The facility operated seven days per week in 1999, during this quarter 
18% of the facility's annual operations occurred. 

1999 osd emissions = (8.259 tons NOx/yr.) x (2,000 lbs/1 ton) x (0.18/(7 days/week x 13 
weeks/ozone season)) 

= 32.7 lbs. NOx/osd 

Below is an example calculation showing the manner in which the 2012 NOx Emissions 
are calculated for a Point Source. A facility located in Jackson county with two-digit SIC 20 
emits 262.4 lbs. NOx/osd. BEA growth factors for SIC 20 in Jackson county are 1 .0621 and 
1.4241 for 1999 and 2012 respectively. 

2012 OSD emissions = (262.4 lbs. NOx/osd) x (1.4241/1.0621) 

= 352 lbs. NOx/OSD 

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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Appendix B summarizes 1999 and 2012 annual and ozone season daily VOC, NOx, and 
CO emissions from point sources by two-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) code 
and county. 

2.4.1.4.2 KDHE Point Source Emissions Calculation Method 

Kansas and Missouri for all practicable purposes used the same calculation methods. 
Examples are provided of MO and KS calculation methods to demonstrate the slight 
differences in original data. Kansas point source emissions were taken from KDHE I-Steps 
emissions inventory database for calendar year 1999 (see reference 5). The reported 
emissions represent the results from facility surveys of actual annual emissions emitted in 
1999. The actual annual emissions were used to calculate an ozone season daily emission 
rate based on the days of operation and the percentage of operating time during the summer 
months of June through August. The following equation was used: 

1999 OSD emissions = (1999 annual emissions) x (2,000 lbs/1 ton) x (Summer operating 
%/Days of operation) 

Emissions projections for calendar year 2012 were performed using the Department of 
Commerce's BEA growth factors. BEA factors were derived for each SCC and county 
combination using EPA EGAS v4.0 software (see reference 6). The BEA growth factors are 
developed from the EPA model. The growth factors are used in the projection of emissions 
for the area. Growth of emissions was normalized to the 1999 inventory base year because 
EGAS v4.0 has a base year of 1996. The following equation was used for the emissions 
projections: 

2012 osd emissions = (1999 osd emissions) x (2012 growth factor/1999 growth factor) 

Below is an example calculation showing the manner in which the 1999 NOx Emissions 
are calculated for a Point Source. This example is for a facility that emitted 8.259 tons of 
NOx in 1999. The facility operated 65 days from June through August 1999, which 
represents 18% of the facility's annual operations. 

1999 osd emissions = (8.259 tons NOx/yr.) x (2 5 000 lbs/1 ton) x (0.18/65 days) 

= 45.7 lbs. NOx/osd 

Below is an example calculation showing the manner in which the 2012 NOx Emissions 
are calculated for a Point Source. A facility located in Kansas Wyandotte county with SCC 
10200602 emits 45.7 lbs. NOx/osd. BEA growth factors for SCC 10200602 in Wyandotte 
county are 1.0162 and 1.1578 for 1999 and 2012, respectively. 

2012 osd emissions = (45.7 lbs. NOx/osd) x (1.1578/1.0162)= 52.1 lbs. NOx/osd 

2.4.2 New Mobile Source Budgets 
2.4.2. 1 Existing Mobile Source Budget 

The existing budgets for 2000 and 2010 were calculated in 1995. In that exercise, the 1990 
level of emissions was assumed to keep the region in compliance with the one-hour ozone 
standard and was used as a cap on overall emissions through 2010. The 2010 level of 
emissions was less than the emissions in 1 990, and the difference was quantified as a margin, 

34 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



which allowed for some growth in emissions from all sectors in 2010. Approximately one- 
third of the margin, which was the percent of overall emissions contributed by vehicles, was 
specifically allocated to motor vehicles. The motor vehicle emissions budget was the 
projected on-road mobile emissions in 2010 (assuming transportation investments through 
2010) plus the motor vehicle proportion of the margin (allowing for growth in mobile 
emissions). A conformity analysis is a demonstration that the regional emissions from 
proposed transportation projects would not exceed the motor vehicle emissions budgets. The 
emission inventory provides a basis for establishing new motor vehicle emission budgets, 
which are used to demonstrate consistency between the region's air quality goals and 
emissions expected from implementation of transportation plans and programs. 

A plan revision submitted by the state in 1995 and approved by EPA (61 FR1 8251 on 
April 25, 1996) establishes the current motor vehicle emissions budgets used to ensure that 
transportation plans conform to the ozone maintenance plan, see 40 CFR 52. 1 321 (e). The 
current budgets are shown in the following table: 



Motor Vehicle Emissions Budget for Conformity Purposes 

Compounds 2000 Attainment MVEB for the KCMA 
Non-methane hydrocarbons 87,548 kg/summer day (96.3 tpd) 
NOx 1 19,889 kg/summer day ( 1 3 1 .9 tpd) 

In June 2002. the MARC Board proposed motor vehicle emissions budgets based on 
updated emissions inventories prepared collaboratively by staff from the Kansas and 
Missouri State air agencies, MARC, and EPA. The proposed budgets were based on 
population and employment forecasts adopted by the MARC board in January 1998. 

The new budgets incorporate updated planning assumptions and use the MOBILE6 model, 
which became available in January 2002. The new budgets are set to keep total emissions 
below their estimated level in 1999 (see Appendix I). The last horizon year of the proposed 
SIP is 2012. 

The mobile budgets are calculated by starting with the on-road mobile 2012 totals for 
VOC, NOx, and adding an extra amount over and above what is necessary, for safety reasons 
or to allow for delays. The extra amount is called the margin. The amount of margin to add 
could be derived using a variety of methods. A simple and easily explained calculation 
method would help in calculating and communicating the budgets. In the recent past the 
VOC budget, NOx budgets and margins have been tied together by ratios of reductions 
between the beginning and last years. The margin for this mobile budget was determined by 
recognizing the NOx budget has led to conformity issues in the past and coupling the 
acquired understanding of the regions ozone level, which is thought to be VOC limited. The 
margin should take into account, that any additional lowering of the VOC margin would have 
more of an impact to regional air quality than placing tighter constraints on NOx emissions. 
A method was chosen that would accommodate a lower VOC margin and allow for the NOx 
emission levels required to maintain conformity and be easy to calculate and communicate. 

The amount of margin chosen for this new budget was based on a straight percent of the 
conformity calculation amounts determined for 2010. The last horizon year for the existing 
SIP is 2010. The amount of the 2010 conformity emission levels was supplied by MARC 
and is 89.6 NOx ton/osd and 51.1 VOC ton/osd. A margin of 0.091 of the 2010 NOx and a 



35 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



margin of 0.07 of the VOC was determined by the inter-agency consultation group process. 
The 2012 NOx budget from the 1999 budget levels represents a 26.2 percent reduction while 
the 2012 VOC budget represents a 40 percent reduction. The 1999 mobile emission budgets 
are 132.4 NOx tons/osd and 91 .4 VOC tons/osd while the new 2012 budgets are 97.8 NOx 
tons/osd and 54.7 VOC tons/osd. 

97.8 NOx tons/osd 2012 divided by 132.4 NOx tons/osd 1999 equals 0.738 

54.7 VOC tons/osd 2012 divided by 91.4 VOC tons/osd 1999 equals 0.598 

(1 minus 0.738) multiplied by 100 equals 26.2 % reduction of NOx from 1999 to 2012 

(1 minus 0.598) multiplied by 100 equals 40.2 % reduction of VOC from 1999 to 2012 

2.4.2.2 New Mobile Source Budget Calculations 



2.4.2.2.1 NOx Calculation 



A. NOx projected emission level needed for conformity in 2010 (Provided by MARC). 
2010 Total Mobile NOx is 89.6 multiplied by 0.091 equals 8.153 tons/osd NOx 

margin 

89.6 tons/osd x 0.091 = 8.153 tons/osd 



B. Add the margin to the 2010 NOx projected mobile emission total 

89.6 tons/osd + 8.153 tons/osd = 97.75 or 97.8 
2012 Mobile Source NOx Budget: 97.8 tons/osd 



2.4.2.2.2 VOC Calculation 

A. VOC projected emission level needed for conformity in 2010 (Provided by MARC). 
2010 Total Mobile VOC is 51.1 multiplied by 0.07 equals 3.57 tons/osd VOC margin 
51.1 tons/osd x 0.07 = 3.57 tons/osd 



B. Add the margin to the 2010 VOC projected mobile emission total 

51.1 tons/osd + 3.57 tons/osd = 54.67 tons/osd 
2012 Mobile Source VOC Budget: 54.7 tons/osd 



36 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2.5 CONTINGENCY MEASURES 

When selecting control measures to implement in case of a violation of the ozone standard 
it is important to consider the implementation time frame. A contingency plan needs to 
contain control measures that can be implemented in a very short time and will demonstrate 
results quickly. Other control measures, which take substantially more time to be 
implemented, can also be included as secondary controls. It is important to concentrate on 
control measures that will achieve results throughout the area. Mobile source control 
measures are ideal for this reason. 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program is obligated under the CAAA to set forth 
a plan to be implemented upon a violation of the ozone standard in the KCMA. The CAAA 
requires setting forth a group of specific control measures to be implemented in case of an 
ozone violation. A pattern of exceedances of the one-hour ozone NAAQS will trigger 
consideration of contingency measures. However, the only federally enforceable trigger for 
mandatory implementation of contingency measures shall be a violation of the one-hour 
ozone NAAQS. 

After 2004, the contingency measures are triggered by different levels of corrective 
responses should the one-hour ozone NAAQS be exceeded or violated, or if emissions in the 
region increase significantly above current levels. A level 1 response would occur in the 
event that the ozone NAAQS establishes a pattern of exceedances, or if VOC or NOx 
emissions increase more than 5% above the levels contained in the attainment year (1999) 
emission inventory. To facilitate the emissions trends analysis, department's Air Pollution 
Control Program commits to compiling VOC and NOx emissions inventories every three 
years for the duration of the maintenance plan. Department's Air Pollution Control Program 
will coordinate with the state of Kansas and MARC to evaluate the causes of exceedances or 
the emission trends and to determine appropriate control measures needed to assure 
continued attainment of NAAQS for ozone. 

A Level 2 response would be implemented in the event that a violation of the one-hour 
ozone NAQQS were to be measured at a monitoring site. In order to select appropriate 
corrective measures, department's Air Pollution Control Program will work with Kansas and 
MARC to conduct a comprehensive study to determine the cause of the violation, and the 
control measures necessary to mitigate the problem. The comprehensive analysis shall 
examine: 

1) The number, location and severity of the ambient ozone concentration; 

2) The weather patterns contributing to ozone levels; 

3) Potential, contributing emissions sources; 

4) The geographic applicability of possible contingency measures; 

5) Emission trends, including timeliness of implementation of scheduled control measures; 

6) Current and recently identified control technologies; and 

7) Air quality contributions from outside the maintenance area. 

Contingency measures shall be selected from those listed in the following table or from 
any other measure deemed appropriate and effective at the time of selection. Control 
measure selection shall be based upon cost-effectiveness, emission reduction potential, 



37 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



economic and social considerations, ease of timing of implementation, and other appropriate 
factors. Implementation of controls shall take place as expeditiously as possible, but no later 
than 18 months after department's Air Pollution Control Program makes a determination, 
based on quality- assured ambient data, that a violation of NAAQS has occurred. 

Adoption of additional control measures is subject to necessary administrative and legal 
process. MODNR will solicit input from all interested parties and affected persons in the 
area prior to selecting appropriate contingency measures. No contingency measures will be 
implemented without providing the opportunity for full public participation. This process 
will include publication of notices, an opportunity for public hearing, and other measures 
required by department's Air Pollution Control Program regulation. 



Contingency Plan for the Kansas City One-Hour Ozone Attainment Area 



Year 


Contingency Measure Trigger 


Action to be Taken 


List of Contingency Measures 


2003 - 2004 


Violation occurs anywhere within the 
maintenance area. 


Depending upon the degree and nature of the 
transgression, the department will begin 
implementation of control measures sufficient to 
achieve at least a five-percent reduction in area 
wide emissions 


Statewide NOx rule (MO) 

Federal Non-road Engine Standards 

One or more of the following will be considered for 

implementation: 

1 ) industrial emission offsets of 1 . 1 5 to 1 ; 

2) stationary source controls for NOx and VOC; 

3) Stage II Vapor Recovery program at gasoline refueling 
stations; 

4) enhanced vehicle emission reductions programs; 

5) alternate fuel programs for fleet vehicle operations; 

6) vehicle anti-tampering programs; 

7) other transportation control measures; 

8) vehicle inspection and maintenance program; 

9) VOC controls on rninor sources, and; 

10) The department will further review and evaluate the 
current VOC rules to see if they need to be tightened, 
changed or modified 


2005-2012 


Level I Trigger 

The KCMA NOx or VOC emissions 
inventories for 1999 increase more than 
5% above the levels included in the 3-year 
emissions inventories updates. 

A pattern of monitor exceedances. 


MO will work cooperatively with KS to evaluate 
the exceedances of the 3-year inventory, or 
determine if adverse emissions trends are likely 
to continue. If so, the States will determine what 
and where controls may be required, as well as 
level of emissions reductions needed, to avoid a 
violation of the NAAQS. The study shall be 
completed within 9 months. If necessary, control 
measures shall be adopted within 1 8 months of 
determination. 


Point Source Measures 

NOx SIP Call Phase II (non-utility) 

Reinstate requirements for Offsets and/or LAER 

Apply RACT to smaller existing sources 

Tighten RACT for existing sources covered by EPA CTGs. 

Expanded geographic coverage of current point source 

measures 

MACT controls for industrial sources 
Other measures to be identified 

Mobile Source Measures 

Tier 2 Vehicle Standards and Low Sulfur Fuel 

Heavy Duty Diesel Standards and Low Sulfur Diesel Fuel 

TCMs, including, but not limited to, area-wide rideshare 

programs, telecommuting, transit improvements, and traffic 

flow improvements. 

Vehicle Testing (OBDII) 

California Engine Standards 

Other measures to be identified 

Area Source Measures 

California Architectural/Industrial Maintenance (AIM) 
California Commercial and Consumer Products 
Broader geographic applicability of existing measures 
California Off-road Engine Standards 
Other measures to be identified 


Level II Trigger 

A violation of the Ozone NAAQS at any 
monitoring station in the KCMA. 


MO will work cooperatively with KS to conduct 
a thorough analysis to determine appropriate 
measures to address the cause of the violation. 
Analysis shall be completed within 6 months. 
Selected measures shall be adopted within 1 8 
months and implemented as expeditiously as 
practicable, taking into consideration the ease of 
implementation and the technical and economic 
feasibility of selected measures. 



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2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



2.6 PROVISION FOR OPERATION OF MONITORING 

NETWORK 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program commits to continue monitoring ozone 
levels according to an EPA-approved monitoring plan, as required to ensure maintenance of 
the ozone NAAQS for the next ten years. Should changes become necessary concerning 
location of a monitoring station, the department's Air Pollution Control Program will work 
cooperatively with the EPA to ensure the adequacy of the monitoring network. The 
department's Air Pollution Control Program will continue to quality assure the monitoring 
data to meet the requirements of 40 CFR 58. The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program will continue to enter all data into the AIRS on a timely basis in accordance with 
federal guidelines. 

Control strategies, area growth, and new source configurations have clearly changed the 
face of ozone formation in the area. Because of the changes, the Kansas City Area State and 
Local Agencies with the EPA Region VII decided that a review of the area network was of 
high priority, to determine if the continued network was adequate. Recommendations for 
network changes were submitted to the EPA on November 6, 2000. A letter from the EPA 
submitted on February 8, 2001, approved monitoring network changes. 

Analysis tools used in the evaluation included basic statistical rankings of exceedances, 
design value trends, point source mappings, population, economic and mobile source 
information, and meteorological wind roses and trajectories. Based upon the examination of 
the data generated from using the tools, a best network configuration, which characterizes the 
ozone levels in the Kansas City Metropolitan Area, was obtained. A team of Kansas, the 
department's Air Pollution Control Program, and EPA staff collected and reviewed data and 
discussed potential recommendations. The most significant findings for the trajectory and 
the wind and episode analysis, coupled with the determination of the emissions centroid, is 
that some parts of the area appeared to be lacking in coverage for potential ozone episodes. 
The area due north of the centroid is the most predominant wind direction from emission 
sources and may be of great potential for exceedances. The area, near the Wyandotte- 
Leavenworth county line is also an area of concern. Precursor emissions in the metropolitan 
area, which may be affected by winds from the east-southeast, could lead to ozone 
exceedances in the area. Wind roses from that direction are also significant, as are forward 
trajectories for high ozone days. The conclusion of the monitoring network review is that 
one additional site should be located due north of the downtown core about 12-15 miles 
downwind. The monitoring equipment for this site originated from the current Worlds of 
Fun monitor site. The moving of Worlds of Fun site to the new site, which is called Rocky 
Creek, occurred in early 2002. The monitor at Rocky Creek is located at 13 13 1 NE 169th 
Highway, Kansas City, MO 64141 with coordinates: 39 deg. 19 min 56 sec. NORTH latitude 
and 94 deg. 34 min 50 sec WEST longitude. Relocation of the Worlds of Fun site to a 

39 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



second area of poor coverage, equidistant from the Liberty and KCI monitors, and in extreme 
northern extent of Kansas City, Missouri was necessary. This was due to the predominant 
wind direction from emission sources due south, and has a greater potential for exceedances. 
An alternative site was selected and approved by the EPA and KDHE near the City of 
Leavenworth in Leavenworth County. These locations will serve as maximum 
concentrations sites for the one-hour ozone NAAQS. The downwind distance from the urban 
area is critical to achieve the proper atmospheric mixing and allow photochemical reactions 
time to occur for high ozone concentrations. Based on the current network and past 
experiences, sites most distant to the north and west will not provide for maximum 1-hour 
ozone concentrations. 

Finally, an additional site in southern Johnson County, Kansas would allow for evaluation 
of potential near term transport. An evaluation of the effect of local sources on Richards 
Gebauer Air Force Base would be possible. 

Monitoring near Richards Gebauer has shown considerable trends in higher ozone levels, 
including recent exceedances. Therefore, the monitoring should continue at the site currently 
being operated. The state of Kansas has assumed the responsibility to install a background 
site in a location generally upwind of the majority of the area, near the southern Johnson 
County line. This site is presently under construction. This is expected to be a more suitable 
site for upwind monitoring for the area. In addition, it will increase the spatial coverage 
south of a part of the area which is experiencing considerable economic growth and 
potentially in ozone precursors. 

2.7 CONFORMITY 

The department's Air Pollution Control Program filed a transportation conformity 
regulation, 10 CSR 10-2.390 Conformity to State Implementation Plans of Transportation 
Plans, Programs, and Projects Developed, Funded or Approved Under Title 23 U.S.C. or the 
Federal Transit Laws, which became effective on December 30, 1996. This rule implements 
section 176(c) of the CAA, as amended (42 U.S.C. 7401-7671q.), the related requirements of 
23 U.S.C. 109(j) and regulations under 40 CFR part 51 subpart T, with respect to the 
conformity of transportation plans, programs, and projects which are developed, funded, or 
approved by the United States Department of Transportation (DOT), and by the metropolitan 
planning organizations or other recipients of funds under title 23 or the Federal Transit Act 
(49 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). This rule sets forth policy, criteria, and procedures for 
demonstrating and assuring conformity of such activities to the applicable implementation 
plan, developed and applicable, pursuant to section 100 and Part D of the CAA. 
Transportation plans, programs, and projects must conform to an implementation plans 
purpose of eliminating or reducing the severity and number of violations of the NAAQS. 
Transportation plans, programs and projects must not cause or contribute to any new 
violation of any standards nor increase the frequency or severity of any existing violations of 
any standard or any required interim emission reductions or other milestones. This rule 
applies to the Kansas City ozone maintenance area. 

A general conformity regulation (10 CSR 10-6.300 Conformity of General Federal Actions 
to State Implementation Plans) was filed on January 30, 1996, and became effective on 
September 30, 1996. This rule implements section 176(c) of the CAA, as amended (42 
U.S.C. 7401 et seq.) and regulations under 40 CFR part 51 subpart W, with respect to the 



40 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



conformity of general federal actions to the applicable implementation plan. Under those 
authorities, no department, agency or instrumentality of the federal government shall engage 
in, support in any way or provide financial assistance for, license or permit, or approve any 
activity which does not conform to an applicable implementation plan. This rule applies to 
all areas in the state of Missouri, which are designated as non-attainment or maintenance for 
any criteria pollutant or standard for which there is a NAAQS. 

A conformity analysis (See List of References #7) is a demonstration that the regional 
emissions from proposed transportation projects will not exceed the motor vehicle emissions 
budgets. If the conformity requirements cannot be met, then only certain types of projects 
may proceed until the requirements can be met. The emission inventory provides a basis for 
establishing new motor vehicle emission budgets, which are used to demonstrate consistency 
between the region's air quality goals and emissions expected from implementation of 
transportation plans and programs. 

The Metropolitan and Statewide Planning Regulations that govern MARC's LRTP and TIP 
require the projects in both documents, for the time periods they cover, to be financially 
constrained and sufficient in project detail to permit an air quality conformity determination. 
Projects for both the LRTP and the TIP are analyzed as a group to determine that their 
projected air quality impacts are lower than a budgeted amount to ensure that the region's air 
quality is not adversely affected by mobile source pollutants. In the case of the LRTP, the 
projects are required to be specific within intervals not to exceed ten years. An important 
limit found in the TIP requires reexamining financial constraint and a new conformity 
determination if one of the projects listed after the first three years be advanced to one of the 
first three years. This requires a TIP amendment, which would require reexamining financial 
constraint and a new conformity determination. The conformity determination for the TIP 
applies only to the first three years of projects, consistent with the period recognized for 
federal programming purposes. 

The 2020 LRTP was found to conform to the plan prior to its adoption in February of 
1999. Conformity of LRTP and TIP must be approved by U.S. Department of Transportation 
(DOT) in consultation with EPA. DOT approved air quality conformity in February 1999 
LRTP update on July 28, 1999, following the governors' of Kansas and Missouri opting in to 
the federal RFG program for the Kansas City region. Once a subsequent court decision 
disallowed maintenance areas from opting into the federal RFG program, the air quality 
conformity of the LRTP was reanalyzed and found to conform by incorporating the 2001 
National Low Emission Vehicle (NLEV) Standard. DOT re-approved conformity of the 
2020 LRTP on February 14, 2000. The existing FY 2000-2004 TIP as amended was most 
recently approved by DOT on February 6, 2001. 

The following table lists the estimated VOC and NOx emissions for the years 2010 and 
2020 for the regional network including those regionally significant capacity projects 
contained in the FY 2002-2006 TP and compares them with their respective motor vehicle 
emissions budgets from the plans. Regionally significant projects in the LRTP beyond the 
time frame of the TIP are also included in the analysis. All figures are in kilograms per 
summer day. 



41 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Year 


seasonally 

adjusted 

VMT/sd 


r aciorcQ 
net mobile 

VOC 
emissions 

Kg/sd 


vat 

Budget 
Kg/sd 


Margin 


r acioreG 
mobile 
NOx 
emissions 
Kg/sd 


1NWX 

Budget 
Kg/sd 


iviargin 


2010 


57,003,000 


57,734 


82,885 


25,151 


85,896 


120,121 


34,225 


2020 


65,758,000 


69,994 


82,885 


12,891 


88,815 


120,121 


31,306 



The conformity analysis clearly indicates that regional motor vehicle emissions of VOC 
and NOx remain below the budgeted level in the proposed regional plan while accounting for 
the network anticipated to be operational as a result of roadway capacity projects listed in the 
2002 TIP. As such the analysis indicates that the 2002 TIP and the 2020 LRTP are in 
conformity with the plan. 



42 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.0 REFERENCES 



3.1 LIST OF REFERENCES 



1 . Kansas City Ozone Maintenance State Implementation Plan Revision: 
Emissions Inventories and Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets for the Kansas City 
Metropolitan Area, Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Bureau of Air and 
Radiation, May, 1995. 

2. Handbook for Criteria Pollutant Inventory Development: A Beginner's Guide 
for Point and Area Sources, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, EPA-454/R-99-037, 
September 1999. 

3. U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census, 
http://www.census.gov. 

4. 1 997 Long-Range Population, Households And Employment Forecast, Mid- 
America Regional Council, updated December 1, 1998, 
http://www.metrodataline.org/mt_jpop.htm. 

5. I-Steps Point Source Data Base, Kansas Department of Health and 
Environment; Bureau of Air and Radiation, Topeka, KS, 1999. 

6. Economic Growth Analysis System (EGAS) v4.0, U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency, http://www.epa.gov/tWchie^emclVproiection/index.html . 

7. Large portions of this section on Air Quality Conformity 
Analysis/Determination and Mobile Budgets closely follow the definition, background, and 
use the data presented or have been directly copied from the MARC web site 
http://www.marc.org/transportation/tip/TIP02-06.html and 
http://www.marc.org/transportation/tip/AOConformitv.pdf 

8. National Air Quality and Emissions Trends Report, 1999 Chapter 2, Criteria 
Pollutants - National Trends 

3.2 LIST OF TABLES 

Table 1 : Ozone Exceedances by Year in the KC Maintenance Area 

Table 2: Ozone Exceedances by Monitor in the KCMA 

Table 3: Ozone Design Values for the KCMA 

Table 4: 1999 and 2012 VOC, NOx & CO Emissions for MO 

Table 5: 1999 and 2012 VOC, NOx & CO Emissions for KS 

Table 6: 1999 and 2012 VOC, NOx & CO Emissions for KCMA 



43 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.3 LIST OF ACRONYMS 



(APCP) 


Air Pollution Control Program 


(AFB) 


Air Force Base 


(BEA) 


U.S. Department of Commerce Bureau of Economic Analysis 


(BEIS) 


Biogenic Emissions Inventory System 


(BIOME) 


Biogenic Model for Emissions 


(PCBEIS-2.2) 


Personal Computer version Biogenic Emissions Inventory System 


(CAA) 


Clean Air Act 


(CAAA) 


Clean Air Act Amendments of 1 990 


(CFR) 


Code of Federal Regulations 


(CO) 


Carbon Monoxide 


(DOT) 


Department of Transportation 


(EIQ) 


Emission Inventory Questionnaire 


(EIIP) 


Emissions Inventory Improvement Program 


(EPA) 


U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 


(VM) 


Inspection and Maintenance 


(KCI) 


Kansas City International Airports 


(KCMA) 


Kansas City Metropolitan Area 


(KDHE) 


Kansas Department of Health and Environment 


(LAER) 


Lowest Achievable Emission Rate 


(LRTP) 


Long Range Transportation Plan 


(MACC) 


Missouri Air Conservation Commission 


(MACT) 


Maximum Achievable Control Technology 


(MARC) 


Mid-America Regional Council 


(NAAQS) 


National Ambient Air Quality Standards 


(NLEV) 


National Low-Emission Vehicle 


(NOx) 


Nitrogen Oxides 


(ORVR) 


Onboard Refueling Vapor Recovery 


(OSD) 


Ozone Season Day 


(PPM) 


Parts Per Million 


(RACT) 


Reasonably Available Control Technology 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



List of Acronyms (cont.) 



(RFG) 

(RVP) 

(SIP) 

(TCM) 

(VOC) 

(VMT) 



Reformulated Gasoline 
Reid Vapor Pressure 
State Implementation Plan 
Transportation Control Measures 
Volatile Organic Compound 
Vehicle Miles Traveled 



3.4 LIST OF APPENDICES 

Appendix A Map of Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Area. 

Appendix B Area, Point, and Off-road mobile emissions for Kansas Plan counties. 

Appendix C Area, Point, and Off-road mobile emissions for Missouri Plan 
counties. 

Appendix D On-road emissions and MOBILE6 parameters. 

Appendix E Letters from Missouri and Kansas State Governors Responding to 
RFG program. 

Appendix F June 28, 2002 Public Hearing Notice and Certification of Publication 
of the Notice. 

Appendix G June 28, 2002 Public Hearing Comments and Responses. 
Appendix H MACC Adoption Certification. 

Appendix I KS and MO Emissions from New Population and Employment 

Forecasts. 

Appendix J October 24, 2002 Public Hearing Notice and Certification of 

Publication of the Notice. 

Appendix K Public Hearing Comments and Responses on Revised Budget. 

Appendix L MACC Adoption Certificate for Revised Budgets and Inventory. 

Appendix M Final EPA Approval of 2002 Kansas City Maintenance Plan. 



45 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



46 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.1 Appendix A 



Map of Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Area. 

The maintenance area includes Jackson, Clay and Platte Counties in Missouri and the 
Kansas Counties of Johnson and Wyandotte. Ray and Cass Counties are not part of the non- 
attainment area, but are included for regional perspective. This map was developed by 
MARC is displayed with the permission of MARC. 




Cass | 
County ] 




1 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 
16 
17 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 



Transcript of Proceedings - 6/28/02 



5 



the certified' mail receipts from the four local 
air pollution control agencies, as well as 
copies of receipts from the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency and the states of Illinois and 
Kansas . 

Madam Chairman, this concludes my 

testimony . 

CHAIRPERSON BEARD: Thank you. 
Tim Hines, I believe, is next. 
TIM HINES, 

a witness, being first duly sworn, testified 
under oath as follows: 

MR. HINES: Good morning, Madam Chair 
and members of the Commission. My name is Tim 
Hines. I'm employed with the Air Pollution 
Control Program as an environmental engineer. 

I work at 205 Jefferson Street in 
Jefferson City, Missouri. I am here to present 
testimony for the 2002 Kansas City maintenance 
plan . 

The plan begins on page 120 of the 
briefing document. I will now begin the 
testimony concerning the 2002 maintenance plan. 

Can everyone hear me? 

Today's presentation will be in three 



AAA Court Reporting Company 

:)01 Consc-r. Suite. 200 Toll lice iHOOl 205-7950 

vcrland Park, Kansas 6620-4 u u u .a.iacoinlroportos.c om 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



48 



MISSOURI AIR CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARING 



r -IDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 

THE KANSAS CITY STAR COMPANY, publishers of 
THE KANSAS CITY STAR, a newspaper published in 
he City of Kansas City, County of Jackson, State of 
Missouri, confirms that the notice and/or advertisement of 

.'(0 DEPT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
■IR POLLUTION CONTROL PROGRAM 
OBOX 176 

5FFERS0N CITY MO 65102 

2239898 

-:iS430 

true copy of which is hereto attached, 

as duly published in the above said newspaper 

3R THE PERIOD OF: 1 Day (s) 

DMMENCING: May 26,2002 

.'[. i: May 26,2002 

AK EDITION (S): 5/26/ 

AR PAPER (S): <J5\ 

LUME: #122 



Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
tlis Tuesday, 28 May, 2002 . 
certify that I was duly qualified 
3S a Notary Public for the State of 
Missouri, commissioned in Jackson 
bounty, Missouri. My commission 
:xpires August 1 8, 2002. 



.aura S Keelina. Notary 



JEFFERSON CITY. MO - The Missouri Air Con- 
servation Commission will hold o public heorlno 
on Konsos Ci*v Ozone Mainfenonce Stale Imple- 
menfalion Plan and other Issues on Friday, June 
28. 2002. The Public Hearing will begin at 9 a.m. al 
The Holiday Inn KCl. Heartland Ballroom II & Ml, 
. 1)832 Plazo Circle. Kansas City, Missouri. The 
commission win hear testimony related to the fol- 
lowing rule oclions. 

" Konsos City Ozone Maintenance Stole Implemen- 
tation Plan 

The Missouri Deportment of Natural Resources' 
Air Pollution Control Program is proposing a 
subsequent Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 
to maintain the ozone standard. The U.S. EPA ap- 
proved the current plan on June 23, 7992 ond ap- 
proved a partial revision on April 24, 1998. The 
Clean Air Acl requires that the State submit peri- 
odic revisions after re-designation as on attain- 
ment area. The plan includes an updated emis- 
sions inventory, emission growth projections, 
contingency measures, ond provides for continued 
operation of the monitoring network. The plan 
shows that the 1999 emissions when projected to 
2012 will not increase. The plan relies on on at- 
tainment level of emissions of volatile oroanic 
compounds and nitrogen oxides to maintain the 
ozone standard through a combination ot control 
measures. These measures include both station- 
ary and mobile source controls. This plan demon- 
strates"*how the area will maintain the ozone 
standard for the next ten years. 

• 10 CSR 10-3.060 {amendment) Maximum Allow- 
able Emoiions of Particulate Matter From Fuel 
Burning Equipment Used for Indirect Healing 

This proposed amendment will eliminate the ex- 
emption tor existing boilers with a capacity rat- 
ing of 10 minion btu/hr or less. 

• 10 CSR 10-4.040 (amendment) Maximum Allow- 
able Emissions, of Particulate Matter From Fuel 
Burning Equipmenl Used for indirect Heating 

This proposed amendment will eliminate the sin- 
gle level of control for new and existing indirect 
heating sources ond replace if with separate lim- 
its for new sources and existing sources. The new- 
limits will then be consistent with those used In ; 
oulstate rule 10 CSR 10-3.060. 

• 10 CSR 10-2.260 (amendment) Control of Petro- 
leum Storage, Loading and Transfer 

This proposed amendment will correct errors 
that were found when reviewing the previously 
adopted amendment. The tank sizes and thus the : 
filling mechanisms and emissions venting con- 
trols hod been switched. It will also odd a defini- 
tion for Stage I Vapor Recovery. 

The above documents will be available for review 
at the following locations: Missouri Deportment 
of Natural Resources. Air Pollution Control Pro- 
gram, 205 Jefferson St., Jefferson City, (573) 75V 
4817; Jefferson City Regional Office, 210 Hoover 
Rood. Jefferson City, (573) 751-2729; Kansas Cits- 
Regional Office. 500 NE Colbern Road, Lee's i 
Summit, (816) 622-7000; Northeast Regional Of-' 
fice, 1709 Prospect Drive. Macon, (M0) 385-2129;' 
Southeast Regional Office, 948 Lester Street, Pop- : 
lor Bluff, (573) S40-975O; St. Louis Regional Office. ! 
9200 Watson Road, St. Louis, (314) 301-7600; j 
Southwest Regional Office, 2040 W. Woodland, i 
Springfield. (417) 891-4300. j 

Persons with disabilities requiring special serv- ; 
ices or accommodations to attend the meeting j 
con make arrangements by calling the division S 
-directly ot (573) 751-7840. the department's loll ; 
free number of (800) 334-6946, or by wrHing Iwg'. 
weeks in advance of the meeting to: Missouri De- ■ 
partment of Naturol Resources, Air Conservation ; 
Commission Secretary, P.O. Box 176, Jefferson 
City, MO 65102. Hearing impaired persons may 
contact the program Ihrough Relay Missouri. 
(800) 735-2966. 

The commission holds public hearings under the 
provisions of chapter 643. RSMo. Citizens wishing 
to speak ci the public hearing should nolify the 
secrelary io the Missouri Air Conservation 
Commission. Missouri Department of Noturoi 
Resources. Air Pollulion Control Program, P. 
Box 176. Jetterson Cily. Missouri 65102-0176. or 
lelophone (573; 751-7840 The .department requests 
persons intending to give verbal presentation* 
clso proviar- o wr ft Jen copy of their testimony fe- 
ttle commission secretary ot the time of- the put-- 
lie hearing The depart tnenl also will occepl writ- 
Jen comment:, foi I tic- record until 5 p.m. on J uly 
5, 2002; pIect,o so no I wo copies of writ ten com 
men Is to Chi of. Pionntnp Seel ion. Air Pollution 
Control Program P O. Box T?6, Jefferson City. 
MO 65102-0176. 

Rule proposors considered al this hearing may De 
adopted by the Missouri Air Conservaf ion Com- ! 
mission as provided tor under authority of. 
643.050. RSMo. For more In forma lion or a com- i 
plefe. meelina agendo, including rules being pre- 
sented for adoption, contact the Missouri De- 
partment of N'olurol Resources' Air Pollution, 
Control Program ot (573) 751-48*7. 



96 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.2 Appendix B 



Area, Point and Off-road mobile emissions for Kansas Plan counties. 



49 



CTIHUBPOSHMSBBEH 



LLC of PULITZER IN< 



^ A01CND3201871 0524 
MDNR - AIR POLLUTION , CONTROL " 
CHERI BECHTEL A/P 
PO BOX 176 

JEFFERSON CTY MO 65102 



"RECEIVED 

AFFIDAVIT .OF PUBLICATION 26C2 JUN ~3 AM 10" 3"? 

MR P0LLUT10K 
CONTROL PGM 



THE ATTACHED ADVERTISEMENT WAS PUBLISHED IN THE ST. LOUIS 
POST-DISPATCH IN CLASSIFICATION 9000, 1 TIME, STARTING ON 
MAY 24, 2002 AND ENDING ON MAY 24, 2002. 



MISSOURI AIR C0RSERVAT10M COtfK 
WILL HOLD POBUCHEiRMlT . 



jerasoN cm, mo tv M*so«*i a* 

Comnusskm wffl hold a pubfic hearing ea tComas 



Friday Jw*e 28, 2002. The Pubec Hearing w3 b*g*e at 9 cjn. a> 
If* Bofckry l» JCC1, Heartland kJropm & SI. 11832 Plaza 
Grde, Kcmas Oty, Mitsoori. The o 

r | n ■ ■§ fj, - £ - M - * . 1 . - 

The Maiawi. Department _ of Naturoi twww' Am Pollution 
Control Program fa pro] 
MoirtwoKt Hqu to tnoiatow the azooe standard. The US. B> A 
approved the cvrrenf pto* on Jew 23, W92 owj app ro ved o 
parte* revision ea Apri 24, 1998. He 0*an Air Ad i*cpwtt that 
Ac State w^e nf periodic revisions efler n-deag^afion as an 
atfcMMooiki area,. The plan Indvdei an ep dated eeaMuoits 

proves for oa at inoo d operation of tfw exwooriog aetworfc. The 
plon shows that toe 1999 mm when.profsOed to 2012 w3 
«ot ■great*. The pkro refiei on oq'ottaiii— id lewd of e w enio ia of 



meoseres jodode-botfi fiolnMry ond enable soorce canfroh. Tha 
plan detnonstratei how the area w31 naintdm the ozone stoodard 
for toe next ten yeorv 

* 10CSR 103X60 (om wdmeaQ Mammtar AMowobfe toiow 
of PorficvJcrte Matter from fpef fJorong EouEpn»en< Used for 
Iwfirecl.Kftofing ■ 

Tha proposed omendateat wSI etffliotrte #w ej ewyfoo for 
easting bo9eri with a copodry rating of 10 «n3m bsv/hr «r 

less. 

* 10 CSC 10-tO<0 (oewodeiear) Matron AUowablt feeistiou 
of Porficelate'Mofler from Foot ftunuag rifjeinK Uted for 
JodVect Heating . ' 

Tha. proposed rWnonrfanenl WZ efim-wte the single level of 
control tor.ecw ee^ easting fe&ecf beotiag soerors ead 
rcplooa it with seporott Units, tor new 
sources. The «ew Ub isnTl tosa be ccAsisteet wife * 
rote 10 CSC 10-3.060. 



10 CSR 10-2-260 (ooeedmesr] Control ofPetroWa Storage, 
loaoangand Transfer 



This propoted t 



t «3 corded « 



■ ieead 



when xrviewing toe preriowh/ adopted OMeeoWnL The tonic 
toes ood **» »Se ^Bng wiAaiweu ood minium wofing 
cottnh hod beM^swilcbed. t w^oko odd^o.deUee tor 
^toge I Vopor Recovery. ->T; . ■:' J " " ' 
The above bocMMab\rB be avoiable to tmwtfAe Mowing 
loootioeb MksooriDopartowat of Natwral fosovrots. Air PoBefion 
Costrel Progrom, 205 Jefieaoa St, Jeffenoa Coy, (573) 751- 
48 1 7; Jeffenoo City R#gW Offioe. 210 Hoover Road. Jeffanoa 
Gry, (573) 75U2729, Koasm Gry Kegioool OfCa^ 500 NE 
Cofium (Lowt Ue's Somnit. (816) 622-7000; Northeast KegW 
Office, 1709 Prospect Drive. Moam. (660) 385-2129; Sotfheast 
ftegionoi Office, 948 Uster Street Poplar filaft (573) 840975a. 
St. Uua IcegMmol Office, 9200 Watson Rood* SL iooa. (314) 
3017600; Southwest Reg«o«al Office. 2040 W. Woodbmd, 
Spriigfiotd. (417)891-4300. ". ' v 

Persom with cUsabilfties r«quwiag tpeciaf 
occommodaUoM |q ofwvj the meef in a < 



arfTmg *w oWori directh/ of (573) 751-7840, Ae 
toll free number at (BOO) 334-6946, "or by waag two wwlu n 
ooVoooe of tKe me c tui g to: AAHsovri Deportawnl of Notuni) 
Reiovrcei, Air Coytservafion Comtnaaon Secretary. P.O. Box 176. 
JefknoA Giy, MO 65102. Heonr»g impaired persons nay cwtfoci 
the progrom rhroogh Retoy Miioon. (800) 735-2966. 
The eommiuioA holds public heorings under Ae pra«isioe& of 
chapter 643, RSMo. Gttzem wnhiog to tpeot of Bm pubCc 
hoofing thowld notify the soenrtary .to the 1 Mssoori Air 
Conservation CommasioA, Missouri Deportment of Motwd 
Resovrces. Air Pofhrnon Control Progrom^ "PO." Box 176. Di-Herson 
Gry, Mksovri 65102-0176, or telephon* (573) 751-7840. The 
deportment requests persons ' intewfog ,to. ghe •" v*rba( 
pr««enfonom oho provide o written copy of their tuiiwauy te *m 
commission secretory CJ the time of the pvbGc heoriog. The 
deportment oho wi! oocept wrinen commentt for tSe record Mml 
5 pja. on July 5, 2002; pUote Mod two copies of wrirtm 
coomenh to Chief, : floMUng ■i^fo^" Ak Pt4urioe ^Control 
Progronv P-O. Box 176, Jefferson Chy, MO 651024)176. / 
Rule propo«ohcoosldered o1^f«eoV^ 

Mosoori Afr ConMrvcn^' CooM^^ (or oaoV 




SWORN TO AND SUBSCRIBED BEFORE ME, 
THIS 27 DAY OF MAY , 2002. 





NOTARY PUBLIC, CITY OF ST. LOUIS 

AFFIDAVIT CHARGE $5.00 EACH 

PATRICIA CARLISLE! 
Notary Public — Notary SeaF 
STATE OF MISSOURI 
St Louis County 
W? Commission Lxpires: June 26, 2005 

). > ST. LOUIS. MO C3 101-3099 > PHOKK 314-340-8000 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



50 



News-Leader 



DNR-Air Pollution Control 



651 Boonville • MPO Box 798 
Springfield, Missouri 65801 
Telephone (417) 836-1100 



Missouri Air 
Conservation Commits Jon 
Will Hold Public Hearing 
JEFFERSON CITY, MO 
— The Missouri Air Con- 
servation Commission will 
hold o public hearing on 
Kansas City Ozone Main- 
tenance Stole Implemen- 
tation Plan and other -Is- 
sues on Friday, June 28, 
2002. The Public Hearing 
will begin at 9 a.m. at the 
Holiday Inn KO, Heart- 
land Ballroom II & 111, 
'1832 flora Circle, Kansas 
tlty, Missouri. The com- 
nisslon will hear testimo- 
iy related to the following 
vie actions. 

Kansas City Ozone Main- 
enance State Implernen- 
ation Plan 

he Missouri Department 
f Natural Resources' Air 
odutlon Control Pro- 
ram Is proposing * sub* 
»auent Kansas City 
zone Maintenance. Pion 
' ma tntoln the ozone 
ondard. The -UJS^ EPA 
>prov»d the current P*an 
J ^3, 1992 and ap- 
m partial revision 
/ 24; £998. The 
e- fr Act requires 
:i >tate submit perl- 
ic . cvfsions after re- 
signation as an attains 
;nt area. The plan in-. 
«des on updated emls- . 
ns Inventory, emission 
twth/ Prolectlons, coo- 
oency. measures, and 
vfdes for continued op- 
tion of the monitoring j 
Work. The plan shows " 
t the 1999 emissions 
en projected to 2012 . 
I not Increase. The 
n relies on on attain- 
it tevet of emissions of - 
stile organic com- 
nds and nitrogen ox- 
to maintain the ozone 
oard through a cornbl- 
on of control mea- 
s. These measures In-* 
e bath stationary and ; 
He source controls, 
plan demonstrates 
the area will main- 
the ozone standard 
r»e next ten years. 
:SR 10-3.060 (amend- 
) Maximum Al low- 
Emissions of "Particle 
rr From Fuel Burn- 
Equipment Used for 
srt Heating 

>ropas«d amendment 
llmfnate the exemp- 
for existing boilers 
□ capacity rating of 
lllon trtumr or less. 



*10 CSR 10-4.0X0 (amend- 
ment) Maximum Allow- 
able Emissions of Particu- 
late Matter From Fuel 
Burning Equipment Used 
_ for Indirect Heating 
' This proposed amend- 
ments will eliminate the 
single level of control for 
new and existing Indirect 
heating sources and re- 
place It with separate lim- 
its for new sources and 
existing sources. The new 
limits will then be consis- 
tent, with those used In 
otrtslate rule 10 CSR 10- 
3.060 

*The CSR 10-2.260 
(amendment) Control of 
Petroleum Storage, Load- 
ing and Transfer 
This proposed amendment 
•will correct errors that 
were found when revfew- 
: Ing the previously adopted 
amendment. The tank siz- 
es ond thus the filling 
mechanisms ond emission 
I venting controls had been 
: switched. . it will also odd 
a definition tor Stage I 
Vapor Recovery. 
The above documents will 
be available for revlew. : at 
;the following, locations? 
, Missouri Department/- of 
Natural Resources, ; Alr 
Pollution Control :Pro- 
vram, 205. Jefferson St, 
Jefferson City, (573) 751- 
4817, Jefferson Cfty Re- 
gional Office, 210 Hoover 
Road,- Jefferson City, 
(573) -751-2729; -Kansas 
City Regional Office, 500 
NE Colbern Rood, Lee's 
Summit, (816)622-7000; 
Northeast Regional Of- 
fice, 1709. Prospect Drive, 
Macon, (660) 385-2129; 
Southeast Regional Office, 
.9X8 Lester Street, Poplar 
Bluff, (573) SX0-975O; St. 
Louis Regional Office, 
'9200 Watson Road, St. 
-Louis, (314) 301-7600; 
Southwest/ Regional Of- 
fice, 2040,* W. Woodland, 
Springfield, (417), B91-430Q. 
Persons with disabilities 
requiring special services 
or accommodations to at- 
tend the meeting con 
make arrangements by 
calling the division direct- 
ly at (573) 751-70X0, the 
department's toll free 
number at (800) 334-6946, 
or by writing two weeks 
In advance of the meeting 
to: Missouri Department 
of Natural Resources, Afr 
Conservation Commission 
Secretary, P.O. Box 176, 



June 4, 2002 



PROOF OF PUBLICATION 

STATE OF MISSOURI 
County of Greene 

I. Marsha Burnett of Springfield. Missouri, of lawful age. do upon 
my oath state that I am the Legal Clerk of the News-Leader, and that I am 
duly authorized to and do make this affidavit for and on behalf of the News- 
Leader, a newspaper published daily in the City of Springfield. Greene 
County, Missouri; that the public advertisment. notice or order of 
publication, a true copy of which is hereto attached, was published in said 
newspaper 1 times upon the following dates: 



First publication on Saturday, May 25. 2002. 

Second publication on , 

Thrid publication on • 

Fourth publication on 

Fifth publication on 

Last publication on 



I do further state under oath that said newspaper has been 
admitted to the Post Office as second class matter: that it is a newspaper of 
general circulation in the City of Springfield, Missouri: that it has been 
published regularly and consecutively for a period of more than three years: 
that it has a list of bona fide subscribers voluntarily engaged as such; who 
have paid or agreed to pay a stated price for a subscription for a definite 
period of time, and that said newspaper has complied with the provisions of 
Section 14968 Revised Statues of Missouri. 1939, relating to "Public 
Advertisements." 



. a* 65102-0176, or telephone 

Jefferson City, MO 65102. Tin) 751-7840. The deport- 
i^^i^^f 1 ^S? 003 - fnent requests persons in- 
mov contoct the program tending to give verbal 
.through Relay Missouri, * T p ^£f atIons also provide 



(800) 735-2966. 

-The commission-^' holds 
public hearings under the 
provisions of chapter 643, 
RSMo. Citizens wishing to 
speak at the public hear- 
ing should notify the sec- 
tary to me. Missouri Air 
Conservation Commission, 
Missouri Department of 
Natural Resources, Air 
Pollution Control Pro- 
gram, P.O. Box 176, Jef- 
ferson City, Missouri 



_ written copy of their 
i testimony to the commis- 
sion secretary at the time 
of the public hearing. The 
departments also will oc- 
cept wrItten'*comme"nts 
for the record'untll 5 P.m. 
on July 5, 2002; please 
'S ~ 



send two. copies of wrttren 
comments to Chief, Plan- 
ning Section, Air Pollut/on 
Control Program, P.O- 
Box 176, Jefferson City, 
MO 05102-01 76. 
Rule proposals considered 
at this hearing may be 
adopted by the Missouri 
Air Conservation Commis- 
sion as provided for under 
authority of 443.050, 



RSMo. For more Informa- 
tion or a complete meet- 
ing agenda, including 
rules being presented for 
adoption, contoct the Mis- 
souri Department of Natu- 
ral Resources' Air Pollu- 
tion^ Control Program at 
(573) 7SI-X817. 



Subscribed and sworn to before me this 



ly commission expires 



3 



Day of 



2002 



Notary Public in and for Greene County, Missouri 



REN EES WATERS 
. -TARY PUBLIC STATE OF MISSOURI 

POLK COUNTY 
MY COMMISSION EXP. JUNE 23 2(XP 



)) GAfsNEIT 



<?3 



999 KANSAS CITY OZONE MAINTENANCE AREA INVENTORY 3/5/2002 
AREA SOURCE EMISSIONS FOR JOHNSON AND WYANDOTTE COUNTY OF KANSAS 



1999 Annual Emissions 1999 Daily Emissions 2012 Daily Emissions 

VOC Nox CO VOC Nox CO VOC Nox CO 

Category Tons Tons Tons Ibs/OSD ibs/OSD Ibs/OSD Ibs/OSD Ibs/OSD ibs/OSD 

JOHNSON COUNTY 

Architectural 

Surface Coating - 729.31 5,289.47 6,541.46 

Asphalt Paving 426.47 3,280.54 4,057,02 

Automobile Refinis 156.23 1,201.78 1,464.89 

Bakeries 31.13 170.58 210.48 

Commercial and C 1,333.80 7,308.49 9,038.37 

Dry Cleaning 13.43 103.30 127.75 

Fuel Oil Combusti 12.30 1,230.08 307.52 19.50 1,950.25 487.56 24.12 2,411.86 602.96 
Gasoline 

Marketing 1,670.33 9,893.33 6,998.41 

Graphic Arts 969.45 7,457.28 8,377.77 

'-^ineration 20.89 31.65 99.62 114.44 173.40 545.84 141.53 214.44 675.04 

.idfills 2,405.26 27.56 13,179.48 151.00 18,712.21 214.36 

'G Combustion 29.19 729.87 102.18 46.29 1,157.18 162.00 57.24 1,431.07 200.35 
Natural Gas 

Combustion 115.88 2,521.78 1,498.50 497.75 11,849.13 7,171.95 550.74 13,003.52 7,879.38 

Open Burning 685.50 137.10 1,942.25 3,756.16 751.23 10,642.44 4,645.22 929.04 13,161.45 

Pesticides 410.50 3,473.44 4,295.59 
Small Industrial 

Surface Coating 981.77 7,552.10 8,180.11 

Solvent Cleaning 569.20 3,648.70 4,486.70 

Structural Fires 6.40 0.82 30.37 32.28 4.11 153.12 39.92 3.95 189.36 

Traffic Markings 139.77 1,419.22 1,755.14 

Wildfires 37.38 6.23 218.03 410.74 68.46 2,395.98 410.74 68.46 2,395.98 

Wood Combustion 927.84 59.31 4,889.17 1,471.06 94.04 7,751.59 1,819.25 116.30 9,586.35 

COUNTY TOTAL 11,672.02 4,716.83 9,115.20 70,325.94 16,047.79 29,461.49 81,934.66 18,178.65 34,905.23 

(tons/day) 35.16 8.02 14.73 40.97 9.09 17.45 



SI 



If"? MISSOURI AIR CONSERVATION COMMISSION WILL HOLD PUBLIC 



HEARING 



JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The Misouri Air Conservation Commission will 
-^BfcofcJ a public hearing on Kansas City Ozone Maintenance State Implementa- 
tion Plan and other issues on Friday, June 28, 2002. The Public Hearing will 
begin at 9 a.m. at the Holiday Inn KCI, Heartland Ballroom II & III, 1 1832 Plaza 
— Circle, Kansas City, Missouri. The commission will hear testimony related to the 
following rule actions. 

* Kansas City Ozone Maintenance State Implementation Plan 

The • Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Air Pollution Control 
Program is proposing a subsequent Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 
f tcmaintain the ozone standard. The U.S. EPA approved the current plan 
on June 23, 1992 and approved a partial revision on April 24, 1998. The 
Clean Air Act requires that the State submit periodic revisions after re- 
designation as an attainment area. The plan includes an updated emis- 
sions inventory, emission growth projections, contingency measures, and 
provides for continued operation of the monitoring network. The plan 
shows that the 1 999 emissions when projected to 2012 will not increase. 
The plan relies on an attainment level of emissions of volatile organic 
compounds and nitrogen oxides to maintain the ozone standard through 
a combination of control measures, these measures include both station- 
ary and mobile source controls. This plan demonstrates how the area will 
maintain the ozone standard for the next ten years. 
10 CSR 10-3.060 (amendment) Maximum Allowable Emissions of 
Particulate Matter From Fuel Burning Equipment Used for Indirect Healing 
This proposed amendment will eliminate the exemption forexisiing boilers 
with a capacity rating of 10 million btu/hr or Jess. 
.10 CSR 10-4.040 (amendment) Maximum. Allowable Emissions of Particu 
late Matter From'Fuel Burning Equipment Used for Indirect Heating 
This proposed amendment will eliminate the single level of control for new 
and existing indirect heating sources and replace it with separate limits for 
the new sources and existing sources. The new ; limits will be consistent 

" - ;fi£C^ ConTroTof Petrdieumlstojage, 4pading 

;a^Transfer *" " r ; ^ 

This .proposed amendment will correct erors that were found when 
reviewing the previously adopted amendment The tank sizes and thus the 
filling mechanisms and emissions venting controls had been switched. It 
-.. ' will also add a definition for Stage I Vaipor Recovery. 
Vjfoe/abqve;^ the following locations: 

^^issbctfPepartiw Natural Resources, Air Pollution Control Program, 205 
^^ffersonSt^ Jefferson City, (573) 751-4817; Jefferson' City Regional Office, 
v^21Q*i6over Road, Jefferson City, (573) 751-2729; Kansas City Regional 
- ^tfffice, ? 500 NE : :Cplbem Road, Lee's Summit, (816) 622-7000;Northeast 
tegional Office, 1709 Prospect Drive, Macon, (660) 385-2129; Southeast 
Regional Office, 948 Lester. Street, Poplar Bluff, (573) 840-9750; St Louis 
^egiohal'6ffic^f592bb Watson Road, St, Louis, (314) 301-7600; Southwest 
f?fiegiotiaI Office. 2040 W. Woodland, Springfield, (417) 89*1-4300. 
Persons with disabilities requiring special services or accomodations to attend 
the meeting' can make arrangements by calling the division directly at (573) 
^751-7840, the department's toll free number at (800) 334-6946, or by writing 
(uqyb weeks in advance of the meeting to: Missouri Department of Natural 
Resources, Air Conservation Commission Secretary, P.O. Box .176, Jejfferspn . 
C ity. MO85102. Hearing impaired persons may c»htacfihe*pr6gram through 1 - 
3S$elay Missouri, (800) 735-2966. 

&he commission holds public hearings under the provisions of chapter 643, 
^RSMa Citizens wishing to speak at the public hearing shduld notify the 
0~secretary to the Missouri Air Conservation Commission, Missouri Department 
° frf Natural Resources, Air Pollution Control Program, P.O. Box 176, Jefferson 
City.' Missouri 65102-0176, or telephone (573) 751-7840. The department 
requests persons intending to give verbal presentations also provide a written 
copy of their testimony to the commission secretary at the lime of the public 
hearing. The department also will accept written comments for the record until 
5 p.m. on July 5, 2002; please send two copies of written comments to Chief, 
Planning Section, Air Pollution Control Program, P.O. Box 176, Jefferson City, 
_^tO-65102-0176. 

~^ule proposals considered at this hearing may be adopted by the Missouri Air 
^Conservation Commission as provided for under authority of 643,050," RSMo. 
iF or rnpre'lnforrriation or a complete meeting agenda, including rules being 
presented for adoption, contact the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' 
Air Polliitibn Control Program at (573) 751-4817. 



Qsruly rates AquUa cetn one step 
"^Sove junk status. 
* r In response, Aquila said its 

"primary focus'Vfor the rest of 

the year is improving its credit 

rating. 

Moody's said it decided on the 
review after Aquila's" first-quar- 
ter earnings slid 40 percent from 
the same quarter last year, and 
cash from operations "fell well 
short of investment needs," 
Moody's said. 

Aquila, formerly UtiliCorp 
United, is one of several energy- 
traders to run into trouble in the 
months since Enron, the 
industry's pioneer, went bankrupt 
amid a scandal over alleged im- 
proper accounting. 

"We were fully aware that 
Moody's action was a potential 
outcome," Aquila's president and 
chief executive officer Robert K. 
Green said in a written statement, 
"We expect to make significant 
progress in short order" ■ 

The new^oun<£6f 150 job cuts 




*ay 22,2002 



Find Out The Latest News, 

Sports, \Veathter& 
Entertainment. Read The 
KiRKSviuji Daily Express! 



by $100 million 4n 
•million in non-core : 
prove its rating. The 
$16 million in corj 
head such as con^r. 
million inexect: 
million from joi 

On Monday, Aqi 
would also drop efi 
control of Quanta S 
The Houston-based 
services for the pou 
telecommunication- 
had opposed attempi 
its largest shareholc 
control. Aquila owi 
percent in Quanta. 

Last week, Standu 
Corp. said Aquila c 
cash crunch if its ere 
graded. 

Also Tuesday, 
nounced that it is droj 
Andersen LLP as m 
firm, and hiring KP' 

Aquila stock clos 
up I I cents, at SI4> 



Kirksville Manor pare Center's 
Manor Caring Award for May 
2002 was given to Justin Smith. 
Justin attends North East Bible 
College, andhas been employed 
at KMCC since February 2002. 
He enjoys spending time work- 
ing with music and singing- Jus- 
tin will spend ten weeks of his 
summer interning as a youth 
pastor. 



WYANDOTTE COUNTY 

Architectural 

Surface Coating 250.80 1,818.99 1,747.97 

Asphalt Paving 233.19 1,793.77 1,723.74 

Automobile Refinis 41.66 320,47 - 390.64 

Bakeries 7.37 40.38 , 49.83 

Commercial and C 458:68 2,513.31 2,415.18 

Dry Cleaning 20.80 160.00 153.75 

Fuel Oil Com busti . 4.23 423.01 105.75 6.71 670.67 167.67 6.44 644.48 161.12 
Gasoline 

Marketing , 637.84 3,777.93 2,076.60 

Graphic Arts 145.81 1,121.60 1,260.04 

Incineration 9.75 14.78 47.24 53.44 80.97 258.85 51.36 77.81 248.75 

Landfills 500.12 5.73 2,740.39 31.40 2,448.65 28.06 

LPG Combustion 10.04 250.99 35.14 15.92 397.94 55.71 15.30 382.40 53.54 
Natural Gas 

Combustion 34.02 718.72 426.22 134.28 3,135.75 1,902.94 141.18 3,322.44 2,014.11 

Open Burning 251.51 50.30 712.62 1,378.15 275.63 3,904.77 1,324.35 264.87 3,752.32 

Pesticides 138.31 1,170.34 1,124.65 
Small Industrial 

Surface Coating 327.63 2,520.23 2,691.85 

Solvent Cleaning 400.72 2,568.73 3,267.05 

Structural Fires 2.20 0.28 10.45 11.10 1.41 52.66 10.67 1.36 50.60 

Traffic Markings 48.07 488.05 469.00 . 

Wildfires 9.97 1.66 58.15 109.55 18.26 639.06 109.55 18.26 639.06 

Wood Combustion 319.07 20.40 1,681.33 505.88 32.34 2,665.68 486.13 31.08 2,561.61 

COUNTY TOTAL 3,851.80 1,480.14 3,082.63 23,249.23 4,612.98 9,678.73 21,963.93 4,742.71 9,509.16 

(tons/day) 11.62 2.31 4.84 10.98 2.37 4.75 

AREA SOURCE T 15,523.82 6,196.97 12,197.83 93,575.17 20,660.76 39,140.22 103,898.59 22,921.36 44,414.40 

(tons/day) 46.79 10.33 19.57 51.95 11.46 22.21 



53 



V 



AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 

STATE OF MISSOURI ) 
County of Boone ) 

I, Ryan Parks, being duly sworn according 10 law, state that I am one of the 
publishers of the Columbia Daily Tribune, a daily newspaper of general circulation 
in the County of Boone. State of Missouri, where located; which newspaper been 
admitted to the Post Office as periodical class matter in the City of Columbia, 
Missouri, the city of publication; which newspaper has been published regularly 
and consecutively for a period of three years and has a list of bona fide subscribers 
voluntarily engaged as such who have paid or agreed to pay a stated price for a 
subscription for a definite period of time, and that such newspaper has complied 
with the provision of Section 493-050, Revised Statutes of Missouri, 2000, and 
Section 59 3 10, Revised Statutes of Missouri, 2000. The affixed notice appeared in 
said newspaper in the following consecutive issues: 

1st Insertion. _May22 _ ,2002 

2nd Insertion, ~ ~ ~ ~ ~~ " " ~ " " ,2002~ 

3rd Insertion^ " . ~ " " 2002 

4th Insertion, .2002" 

5th Insertion," - ■ ■ - - - ",2002" 

6th Insertion, _ ^ -^qqj 

7th Insertion^ " " " " - - - - - -^Qof 

Sth Insertion^ _ " " " " " " " ----- - - - -2002 

9th Insertion, " ~ " ~ " ,2002 

10th Insertion, [ * "* ' ~ ".2002" 

1 1th Insertion, _ ~ " ~ ",2002" 

12th Insertion," " " " " ~ "2002 

13th Insertion/ " " - - - 

14th Insertion, - - - - - -jj^ 

15th Insertion, "~ ----- - ~ ",2002' 

16th Insertion, ~ -------- - 

17th Insertion, ' '_ - - - - . . . . _ ^ 

18th Insertion, _ ~ ~ " - - - ■ - 'jj^ 

19th Insertion, ~ " " ~ ,2002 

20th Insertion," " " ' " " "^2002" 

21st Insertion, ... _ ^2002 

22nd Insertion, _ " ------ - - - '^qqj 

PRINTTEftj? FEE: S 124.00 

By ^ '~ ' J ' 

Subscribed and swom to before me this 

Notary Public 
My Commission Expires Jan 3, 2006 



MISSOURI AIR CONSERVATION 
-. COMMISSION WILL HOLD 

PUBLIC HEARING 
. JEFFERSON CITY, MO-The Mis- 
souri Air Conservation- Commission 
will hold a public hearing on Kansas 
City Ozone Maintenance State Im- 
.plementation Plan and other issues 
•on Friday, June .28, 2002. The Pub- 
lic Hearing will begin at 9 ajn. at 
;the Holiday Inn KCI, Heartland 
.Ballroom II & ffl, 11832 Plaza Or- 
•de, Kansas City, Missouri. The 
; commission will hear testimony re- 
flated to the following rule actions. 
. * Kansas City Ozone Maintenance 
State Implementation Plan . 
The Missouri Department of 
' Natural Resources* Air Pollution 
Control Program is proposing a 
subsequent Kansas Dry Ozone 
Maintenance Plan to maintain 
' the ozone standard. TheUS. 
EPA approved the current plan 
on June 23, 1992 and approved 
partial revision on April 24, 
\ 1998. The Qean Air Act re- 
quires that the State submit pe- 

• riodic revisions after re- 

• . designation as an attainment 

\ area. The plan includes an up- 
\ dated emissions inventory, emis- 
sion growth projections, contin- 
gency measures, and provides 

* for continued operation of the 

* monitoring network. The plan 
shows that the 1999 emissions . 



7' ! N 




jm axi o fuary yf) \—*n » 



^7 



.,2002 



sizes and thus the filling mecha- 
; - . nisms and emissions venting 
controls had been switched It 
will also add a definition for 
Stage I Vapor Recovery. 
The above documents will be avail- 
able for review at the following lo- 
cations: Missouri Department of 
Natural Resources, An- Pollution 
Control Program, 205 Jefferson Sl, 
Jefferson Cdy, (573)751-4817; Jef- 
ferson City Regional Office, 210 
Hoover Road, Jefferson City, 
(573)751-2729; Kansas City Region- 
al Office, 500 NE Colbern Road, 
Lee's Summit, (816)622-7000; 
Northeast Regional Office, 1709 
Prospect Drive, -Macon,- (660)385- 
2129; Southeast Regional Office, 
948 Lester Street, Poplar Bluff, 
(573)840-9750; St Louis Regional 
Office, 9200 Watson Road, St Lou- 
is, (314)301-7600; Southwest Re- 
gional Office, 2040 W. Woodland, 
Springfield, (417)891-4300,, . 
Persons with disabilities "requiring 
special services or accommodations 
to attend the meeting can make ar- 
rangements by calling the division 
directly at (573)751-7840, the de- 
partment's toll free number at 
(800)334-6946, or by writing- two 
weeks in advance of the meeting to: 
Missouri Department of Natural Re- 
sources, Air Conservation Commis- 
sion Secretary, P.O.B0X 176, Jeffer- 
son Ory,* MO 65102. . ..Hearing 

d persons may contact the 

program through Relay Missouri, 
(800)735-2966. - : 
The comnussion Jwldsjniblic hear- 
ings under the provisions of chapter 
eSi'ltSMa^-* Citizens wfehuig to 
speak at the pubhx hearmg should 
nothY the secretary \ 
Air Conservation Coimnission, Mis- 
souri Department of. -Natural Re- 
sources, Air Pollution Control Pro- 
PO Rmr 17fi.' JfiffRTKon Qtv. 

4041 



GEORGE ROBINSON 




Notary Public - Notary Seal 




STATE OF MISSOURI 




Boone County 




My Commission Expires: Jan. 3, 2006 





1999 KANSAS C(TY MAINTENANCE AREA INVENTORY 

JOHNSON AND WYANDOTTE COUNTY POINT SOURCE EMISSIONS SUMMARY BY 2-DIGIT SIC 



12/5/2001 



1999 Annual (tons/yr) 1999 Daily (Ibs/OSD) 2012 Daily (Ibs/OSD) 



SIC2 


DESC1 


voc 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


JOHNSON COUNTY 




















27 


Printing, Publishing And Allied Industries 


296.0 


0.6 


0.1 


2,441.6 


5.3 


1.1 


2,744.6 


6.0 


1.2 


28 


Chemicals And Allied Products 


Dt-.O 


r» o 
U.-c 




AO 1 T 


1 7 


1 A 


tOU.U 


1 Q 


1 ^ 

1 .D 


29 


Petroleum Refining And Related Industries 


6.5 


24.3 


14.7 


50.3 


180.5 


119.5 


58.3 


206.9 


137.4 


30 


Rubber And Miscellaneous Plastics Products 


98.4 


1.8 


0.4 


757.1 


14.0 


3.2 


864.5 


17.8 


4. 1 


32 


Stone, Clay, Glass And Concrete Products 


0.0 


1,344.3 


133.5 


0.2 


6,795.3 


675.1 


0.3 


7,181.4 


713.6 


34 


Fabricated Metal Products, Except Machinery & Tran 


15.1 


0.1 


0.0 


116.2 


1.0 


0.2 


132.4 


1.1 


0.2 


35 


Industrial And Commercial Machinery & Computer Equ 


8.9 


0.1 


1.1 


68.1 


0.7 


8.3 


79.1 


0.8 


10.6 


39 


Miscellaneous Manufacturing Industries 


68.8 






529.4 






603.2 






48 


Communications 


0.0 


0.3 


0.1 


0.0 


0.2 


0.1 


0.0 


0.2 


0.1 


49 


Electric, Gas And Sanitary Services 


28.9 


163.1 


62.7 


155.5 


1,025.3 


404.1 


180.6 


1,252.7 


483.9 


51 


Wholesale Trade-Nondurable Goods 


52.9 






290.8 






337.5 






59 


Miscellaneous Retail 


0.0 


0.8 


0.2 


0.2 


4.5 


0.9 


0.3 


5.2 


1.0 


76 


Miscellaneous Repair Services 


4.1 






31.5 






35.8 






COUNTY TOTALS 


634.6 


1,535.7 


213.0 


4,862.3 


8,028.5 


1,213.8 


5,516.6 


8,674.1 


1,353.8 




tons 








2.4 


4.0 


0.6 


2.8 


4.3 


0.7 



MISSOURI AIR 
CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION WILL 
HOLD PUBLIC 
HEARING 

JEFFERSON, CITY. 
MO - The Mtssouri Air 
Conservation 
Commission will hold a 
public hearing on Kansas 
City Ozone Maintenance 
Stair Implcmcniaiion 
Plan and other issues on 
"riday, June 28, 2002. 
rhe Public Hearing will 
xrgin at 9 a.m. at (he 
holiday Inn KCI. 
i cart land Ballroom II & 
II. M832 Plaza Circle, 
[ansa* City, Missouri, 
"he commission will hear 
simony related lo (he 
blowing rule actions. 

• Kansas City Ozone 
laintcnancc Stale 
np I c menial ion Plan 

rhe Missouri 
apartment of Natural 
sources* Air Pollution 
)ntroI Program is pro- 
sing a subsequent 
insas City Qzonc 
linlenuncc Plan to 
lintain the ozone sun- 
-d. The U.S. .EPA 
5roved the current plan 
June 23, 1992 and 
>rovcd a partial rcvi- 
» on April 24. 1998. 
- Clean Air Act 
uircs that the Stale 
•mil periodic revisions 
t rc-des ignalion as an 
inmeni area. The plan 
udes an updated emis- 
is inventory, emission 
vth projections, -.con-' 
ency measures, and 
rides for continued 
nation of the monitor- 
network. -The plan 
i-slhat die 1999 cmis- 
^ when projected to 
* will not increase: 
plan relics on .an 
lmcnt level of emis- 
of volatile organic 
>ounds and nitrogen 
:s lo maintain the 
: siandard through a 
>ination of control 
urcs. These measures 
tic hcjth stationary 



trols had been switched. It 
will also add a definition 
for Stage 1 Vapor 
Recovery. 

■Thr fftntc documents 
will . be available for 
review at lhe*following 
locations: Missouri 
Department of Natural 
Resources, Air Pollution 
Control Program, 205 
Jefferson St.. Jefferson 
City. (573) 751-4817: 
Jefferson City Regional 
Office. 210 Hoover Road. 
Jefferson City. (573) 751- 
2729: Kansas City 
Regional OlTice, 500 NE 
Colbcrn Road. Lee's 
Summit. (816) 622-7000; 
Northeast Regional 
Office, 1709 Prospect 
Drive, Macon. (660) 385- 
2129; Southeast Regional 
Office, 948 Lester Street. 
Poplar Bluff, (573) 840- 
9750; St. Louis Regional 
Office. 9200 Watson 
Road, St. Louis. (314) 
301.7600; Southwest 
Regional Office. 2040 W. 
Woodland. Springfield. 
(4I7)89M300. 

Pctsons with disabilities 
requiring special services 
or accommodal ions io 
attend the meeting can 
make arrangements by 
calling the division direct- 
ly at (573) 751-7840. ihc 
department's u>ll free 
number at <800) 334- 
6946. or by writing two 
weeks in advance of the 
meeting to: Missouri 
Department of Natural 
Resources, Air 
Conservation 
Commission Secretary. 
P.O. Box 176, -Jefferson 
City. MO 65102. Hearing 
impaired persons may 
contact the program 
through Relay Missouri. 
(800) 735-2966. 



The commission holds 
public hearings under the 
provisions ol' chapter 643 
■RSMo. Citi Zens wishing 
to speak at the public 
hearing should notify the 
secretary to the Missouri 
A i r Conscr vat i on 

Commission. Missouri 
Department of* Natural 
Resources. Air Pollution 
Control Program. P.O. 
Box 176. Jefferson Ciiv. 



AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 

STATE OF MISSOURI) 
COUNTY OF BUTLER) ss. 

I, Don Schrieber, being duly sworn according to law, state that I am PUBLISH!. 
oftheDAILYAMERICANREPUBLICadaiJynewspaperof general circulation 
in the counties of Butler, Ripley, Carter, Wayne, Stoddard, New Madrid and 
Pemiscot; which newspaper has been admitted to the Post Office as second class- 
matter in City of Poplar Bluff, Missouri, the city of publication; which newspaper 
has been published regularly and consecutively for a period of three years and has 
a list of bona fide subscribers voluntarily engaged as such who have paid or agreed 
to pay a stated price for a subscription for a definite period of time and that such 
newspaper has complied with the provisions of Section 493.050, Revised Statutes 
of Missouri 1969. The affixed notice appeared in said newspaper in the following 
consecutive issues: 



1st 


Insertion 


Vol. J.il 


No. 


2nd 


Insertion 


Vol 


No". 


3rd 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


4th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


5th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


6th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


7th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


8th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


9th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 


10th 


Insertion 


Vol 


No . 



. ISU. No. 1JA .C£3day of XDOUmO^ 



day ot .U..JL*j2UU.cX 
day of 20 



. day of . 
. day of , 
. day of . 
. day of . 
. day of . 
. day of . 



.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 
.20 



day of 20 

day of 20 




PUBLISHER 

Subscribed and sworn to before rneohis '"^.'3 ^ av °f - 
20 09 ■ ^ 1 ' ' / /7 J 



My commission 




Publication Fee 5 



/ nqta: 

expires 



TARY PUBLIC 



go 



WYANDOTTE COUNTY 



14 


Mining And Quarrying Of Nonmetallic Minerals 


0.1 


3.2 


0.7 


1.1 


26.1 


5.5 


1.3 


29.7 


6.3 


20 


Food And Kindred Products 


168.7 


32.8 


13.0 


962.1 


222.2 


82.5 


1,166.5 


256,5 


96.9 


26 


Paper And Allied Products 


24.3 




0.2 


187.2 




0.0 


210.3 




0.0 


27 


Printing, Publishing And Allied- Industries 


34.8 


0.9 


77.3 


271.9 


0.0 


494.0 


306.9 


0.0 


549.2 


28 


Chemicals And Allied Products 


169.6 


115.7 


5.9 


1,119.0 


732.6 


67.9 


1,274.0 


811.1 


78.5 


29 


Petroleum Refining And Related Industries 


3.7 


10.7 




42.9 


126.2 




49.7 


144.8 




30 


Rubber And Miscellaneous Plastics Products 


0.2 


3.7 


0.9 


1.1 


23.8 


6.0 


1.4 


27. 1 


6.8 


32 


Stone, Clay, Glass And Concrete Products 


213.5 


435.1 


342.8 


1,260.5 


2,483.6 


1,886.0 


1,342.6 


2,688.6 


2,020.0 


34 


Fabricated Metal Products, Except Machinery & Tran 


107.5 


42.8 


328.0 


832.0 


236.2 


1,802.5 


944.9 


263.9 


2,002.5 


35 


Industrial And Commercial Machinery & Computer Equ 


50.7 


0.5 


0.1 


440.3 


3.8 


0.9 


501.6 


4.3 


1.1 


36 


Electronic & Other Electrical Equipment & Componen 


25.4 






182.2 






207.6 






37 


Transportation Equipment 


1,476.7 


49.6 


10.4 


11,177.7 


357.0 


75.3 


14,168.7 


410.9 


87.5 


49 


Electric, Gas And Sanitary Services 


105.9 


6,808.9 


465.3 


694.3 


51,363.6 


3,308.5 


859.9 


64,381.7 


4,138.5 


51 


Wholesale Trade-Nondurable Goods 


462.7 


17.2 


42.4 


2,574.5 


93.2 


229.7 


2,987.1 


108.2 


266.6 


80 


Health Services 


0.6 


27.1 


6.8 


2.0 


94.7 


24.1 


2.5 


115.9 


29.5 


COUNTY TOTALS 


2,844.5 


7,548.1 


1,293.9 


19.748.6 


55,763.0 


7,983.0 


24,024.8 


69,242.7 


9,283.3 




tons 








9.9 


27.9 


4.0 


12.0 


34.6 


4.6 


TOTALS 




3,479.0 


9,083.8 1,506.9 


24,610.9 


63,791.5 


9,196.8 


29,541.4 


77,916.8 


10,637.1 




tons 








12.3 


31.9 


4.6 


14.8 


39.0 


5.3 



Appendix F 



June 28, 2002 Public Hearing Notice 
and Certification of Publication of the Notice. 



79 



1999 KANSAS CITY MAINTENANCE AREA INVENTORY 

OffRoad Mobile Source Emission Summary for the Kansas Counties of Johnson and Wyandotte 



i 



3/5/2001 





1999 Annual Emissions (tons/yr) 


1999 Daily Emissions (Ibs/OSD) 


2012 Daily Emissions (Ibs/OSD) 


Source Category . i 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


VOC 


NOx 


CO 


Johnson 




















Agricultural Equipment 


26.2 


218.1 


129.1 


269.0 


2,241.3 


1,315.9 


147.8 


1,522.1 


1,426.5 


Airport Equipment 


2.0 


9.2 


19.1 


11.1 


50.7 


103.3 


5.4 


41.7 


122.1 


Commercial Equipment 


582.6 


505.8 


14,323.9 


3,728.6 


3,207.7 


91,466.6 


2,604.3 


3,723.5 


133,794.4 


Construction and Mining Equipment 


915.0 


4,906.2 


6,015.7 


9,045.3 


48,258.4 


58,723.4 


3,668.0 


31,168.5 


53,253.8 


■Industrial Equipment 


90.1 


600.2 


2,199.5 


547.6 


3,722.2 


13,722.5 


259.7 


4,037.0 


13,969.2 


Lawn and Garden Equipment (Com) 


2,025.0 


468.1 


27,531.8 


18,163.8 


4,536.1 


264,397.0 


9,807.3 


4,586.6 


331,617.6 


Lawn and Garden Equipment (Res) 


448.0 


27.5 


6,601.0 


2,918.8 


180.2 


44,576.9 


1,492.7 


198.3 


54,700.2 


Logging Equipment 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


Pleasure Craft 


13.1 


0.8 


29.5 


61.2 


3.6 


129.7 


41.2 


5.0 


130.8 


Railroad Equipment 


1.6 


6.7 


15.6 


11.1 


46.7 


108.1 


5.5 


35.6 


111.9 


Recreational Equipment 


.. 93.5 


10.5 


. 1,226.9. 


645.4 


78.2 


8,791.1 


641.3 


66.6 


9,673.1 


Aircraft 


23.2 


3.9 


727.3 


126.9 


21.6 


3,985.1 


153.5 


26.1 


4,821.6 


Commercial Marine Vessels 


0.0 


' 0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


Railroad Locomotives 


76.4 


1,961.9 


193.2 


418.4 


10,750.2 


1,058.4 


519.2 


8,780.7 


1,517.9 


COUNTY TOTALS 


4,296.6 




59,012.6 


35,947.1 


73,096.7 


488,378.1 


19,346.0 


54,191.6 


605,139.2 


(tons/day) 








18.0 


36.5 


244.2 


9.7 


27.1 


302.6 



Mr. Dermis Grams 
July 7, 2000 
Page 2 



gasoline will be introduced into the Kansas City area in a much more expeditious manner 
providing measurable VOC reductions next year. Finally, accounting for the VOC reductions 
attributable to reducing the vapor pressure of cold cleaning solvents will onJy add to the benefits 
realized by implementing a VOC reduction program that builds op the federal initiative rather 
than implementing a program that becomes less effective as vehicles with OB VR penetrate the 
fleet. 

If you have any Questions or desire additional infonnatioa. please contact Jan Sides, 
Director of the Bureau of Air and Radiation, at 785/296-1551 . 




Sincerely, 



Governor 



Source Category 



1999 Annual Emissions (tons/yr) 

VOC NOx CO 



1999 Daily Emissions (Ibs/OSD) 

VOC NOx CO 



i 

2012 Daily Emissions (Ibs/OSD) 
VOC NOx CO 



Wyandotte 




Agricultural Equipment . 


5.2 


Airport Equipment 


0.0 


Commercial Equipment 


126.2 


Construction and Mining Equipment 


77.9 


Industrial Equipment 


48.0 


Lawn and Garden Equipment (Com) 


220.1 


Lawn and Garden Equipment (Res) 


211.5 


Logging Equipment 


0.0 


Pleasure Craft 


18.0 


Railroad Equipment 


0.6 


Recreational Equipment 


16.6 


Aircraft 


0.1 


Commercial Marine Vessels 


0.6 


Railroad Locomotives 


232.8 


COUNTY TOTALS 


957.5 


(tons/ day) 




TOTALS 


5,254.10 


(tons /day) 





43.0 


25.4 


53.0 


441.6 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


109.5 


3,101.9 


807.4 


694.6 


417.9 


512.4 


770.4 


4,110.1 


328.6 


1,271.9 


294.8 


2,056.8 


50.9 


- 2,992.0 


1,974.0 


493.0 


13.0 


3,117.3 


1 ,378.4 


85.1 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


1.1 


40.6 


84.1 


4.9 


2.5 


5.9 


4.2 


17.6 


2 


253.1 


114.3 


15.2 


0.0 


3.3 


0.6 


0.1 


14.5 


1.6 


3.0 


79.4 


4,917.4 


504.1 


1,275.5 


26,944.7 


5,900.4 


11,829.4 


6,759.7 


34,943.0 






3.40 


17.50 


5,900.40 


70,842.10 


42,706.80 


108,039.70 






21.4 


54 



259.3 


29. 1 


299.9 


281. 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0,( 


19,807.3 


564.0 


806.3 


28,973.: 


5,001.4 


312.4 


2,654.6 


4, 535.1 


7,959.7 


128.2 


2,256.1 


8,002. J 


28,733.6 


1,065.8 


498.5 


36,038. £ 


21,051.2 


704.9 


93.6 


25,831.6 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


O.C 


178.3 


56.7 


6.9 


179.8 


40.6 


2.1 


13.4 


42.1 


1,796.50 


111.3 


12.5 


1.987.9C 


18.0 


0.7 


0.1 


21.8 


8.8 


3.4 


89.7 


9.£ 


2,762.3 


1,203.7 


20,060.9 


3,521.6 


87,616.9 


4,182.2 


26,792.6 


109,426.7 


43.80 


2.10 


13.40 


54. 7C 


;75,995.00 


23,528.20 


80,984.20 


714, 565. 9C 


288 


11.8 


40.5 


357.3 



STATE OF KANSAS 



BILL GRAVES, Governor 
S'alr Capitol, 2r\d Floor 
Tcczka. Kansas 66612-1590 




OSS) 19^3232 
FAX: (785) 296-7973 



Office of the Governor 



July 7, 2000 



Mr. Dennis Grams 

Region VU Administrator 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency 

901 N. 5* Street 

Kansas City, KS 66101 

Dear Mr. Grams: 

This letter is in response to your letter dated April I J , 2000 in which you request the state 
of Kansas to select a control strategy to satisfy the Kansas City maintenance plan contingency 
measures now that tlje courts have determined that reformulated gasoline is no longer an option 

The State of Kansas will commit to implement a 7.0 Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) fuel 
program in Johnson and Wyandotte counties with a target date of the summer of 2001. This will 
amount to creditable VOC reductions of 2.33 tons per day if implemented throughout the five 
county Kansas City maintenance area. The State of Kansas wiD also commit to implementation 
of a phased program to reduce vapor pressure of cold cleaning solvents to less than or equal to 
1 .0 mmHg. It is estimated this will amount to creditable VOC reductions in excess of 3 tons per 
day if implemented throughout the five county Kansas City maintenance area. These two centre : 
measures will provide more than a 5.33 ion per day reduction in VOCs as compared to the 
ions per day from a Stage II program. Implementation schedules will be submitted under separate 
cover. 

It is my policy to assure, to the extent povsnhic, that state programs complement any related 
federal initiatives in order to provide the maximum benefit at the least cost. For this reason, it 
would appear to mc to be counterproductive and against good public policy to propose 
implementation of Stage fl vapor recovery u\ light of the mtroduction of on-board fuel vapor 
recover/ (OBVR) in newer motor vehicles. Using the California esrirnation of the fleet 
penetration of OBVR motor vehicles, by ihc year 2003 the combination of VOC reductions 
attributable to 7.0 RVP gasoline plus thos:? strribulablc to the motor vehicle fleet with OBVR. 
will result in a VOC reductions equal to 70/i of the reductions attributable to Stage II. By the 
year 2003, VOC reductions attributable :o 7.0 RVP gasoline plus OBVR will already exceed 
VOC reductions which would be reaJued by implementing Stage U. In addition, 7.0 RVP 



11 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.3 Appendix C 



Area, Point, and Off-road emission sources for Missouri Plan counties. 



57 



-2B00 13 •'24 



Mr. Dennis Grams 
August 22, 2000 
Page Two 

To assure our air quality problems in Kansas City are resolved, I am directing the 
Missouri Department of Natural Resources to revise the Kansas City Ozone Maintenance 
Plan and require implementation of additional control strategies upon further violation of 
the one hour primary national ambient air quality standard for ozone. These 
contingencies shall include implementation of stage II vapor recovery and industrial 
emissions offsets for all major new sources or source modifications. 

If you have any further questions or concerns, please contact Mr. Stephen 
Mahfood, Director, Department of Natural Resources at (573) 751-^732. 



Very truly yours, 




MC:kds 



cc: 



Governor Bill Graves, Kansas 

David Warm, Mid-America Regional Council 



1L 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



58 



Office of the Governor 



STATE OF MISSOURI QFQ ; : '-jv^fTp,,, 
JEFFERSON ClTY 1 ^ ^^^l^hbr^ 



65101 

Mel Carnahan state capito 

SOV(<)NOfl ROOK 216 

131+) 7S 1-31 Z 



August 22, 2000 



Mr. Dennis Grams 
Region VTT Administrator 
US Environmental Protection Agency 
901 North Fifth Street 
Kansas City, KS 66101 

Dear Mr. Grams: 

This letter is in response to your letter dated April 11, 2000, which requested that 
the State of Missouri select a control strategy to satisfy the Kansas City Ozone 
Maintenance Plan contingency measures now that reformulated gasoline has been 
eliminated as a viable contro] measure. 

Missouri is committed to resolving the air quality problems in Kansas City. The 
State of Missouri commits to implementing a 7.0 Reid Vapor Pressure (RVP) gasoline 
program in Clay, Platte, and Jackson counties with an implementation date of June 1 , 
2001. The implementation of 7.0 RVP gasoline will require the Missouri Department of 
Natural Resources to revise both the Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan and the 
Kansas City RVP rule. The department is currently working on the schedule for both of 
these revisions. 

In addition, the current Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan requires emission 
reductions beyond those achieved by the implementation of 7.0 RVP gasoline. 
Therefore, the Slate of Missouri will revise the current petroleum liquid storage, loading 
and transfer regulation ro include additional reporting and inspection requirements as 
well as the installation and testing of pressure vacuum relief valves. The State of 
Missouri also intends to implement a cold solvent cleaning regulation similar to that 
recently developed for the St. Louis ozone nonattainment arce. 




AIR POLLUTION CONiROL 
oroGRAM 



Area source emissions for Missouri SIPeounties 



Missouri Area Emission Sources 




2446.72 0.00 0.00 Architectural Coating 

1.66 0.00 0.00 Asphalt Paving - Cutback 

0.00 0.00 Asphalt Paving - Cutback 

0.00 0.00 Asphalt Paving - Emulsified 

0.00 0.00 Auto-body Refinishing 

wmmmmmmmmmw-^ ■■■■ ' v- 

2216.68 0.00 0.00 Auto-body Refinishing 

0.00 0.00 Bakeries 

53.62 62.09 CommerciaJynsLituu'onaJ CoaJ Combustion 

(ffil^lig^ Combusuori . 

522.38 604.86 Commercial^ Institutional Coal Combustion 

92.11 23.03 Commercial\Instituu"onal Fuel Oil Combustion 

25.57 3.47 Commercial\InstitutionaJ LPG Combustion 

249.16 33.81 Commercial \ Institutional LPG Combustion 

525.00 441.00 Commercial\Insu'tutional Natural Gas Combustion 

1469.72 0,00 0.00 Consumer / Commercial Solvent Use 

11352.94 0.00 0.00 Consumer / Commercial Solvent Use 

701.49 0.00 0.00 DRY CLEANING 

0.00 0.00 0.00 Forest/Wild Fires 

577.03 Forest/Wild Fires 

0.00 0.00 Gasoline Marketing - Stage I 

0.00 0.00 Gasoline Marketing - Stage II 

0,00 0.00, Gasoline Marketing - Stage II 



29 047 CLAY NA 

mmmmmmmmmimmtmm 





2856.52 64.92 




0.00 0.00 Gasoline Marketing -Tajik Breathing boss 

0.00 0.00 Graphic Arts 

574.71 0.00 0.00 Graphic Arts 

7.68 2816.03 64.00 Industrial Coal Combustion 



Jul-28-99 02:02pm 



From-FED TRANSIT ADWi N 



+8165230927 



T-Z12 P. 03/03 F-582 



The Honorable Carol Browner. 
July 2S 7 1999 

Our concerns regarding the groundwater contamination potential of increased levels ofMTBE 
were validated by the report of your MTBE advisory patneL Eigfiry-eight percent of petrolecaa clean-up 
sites in Kansas arc coma frt ma Tg d with MXBE, In addition, Kansas experience corroborates that MTBE 
molecules travel unusually fern through soil and wto groundwater, la Rnsh Center, Kansas, MTBE had 
migrated under monitoring Wells, to public wells despite the feet that the contaminant plume *=va$ well 
defined. Fermanem, long-term trcaiment at the public water plant was required. 

The det3SsIon.to opt-in should be viewed as a short term, stop-gap measure made in raponsc to an 
aififcjal crisis gtumixd by transportation conformity requirements. Since the demonstrates that 
additional refining capacity for KFG is not needed, a long-term solution slwnM nor be held cqrtlve until 
Jaiiuaxy 1, 2004, a date that cannot now be justified in regard to its original purpose. Therefore, I 
reiterate my request to continue to review alternatives to KFQ hx order to develop and iroplerseur ih/z most 
effective manner for improving Kansas City air qualify. Also, I pledge to work with you in your efforts 
to reduce the use of MIBE in gasoline as quickly as possible I am confident that a perfonrra-ace based 
state blend, Which could include ethanol will continue to improve Kansas City air quality mc meet your 
goal. 

Xft addition, with the introduction of RFG into too Kansas City area, both State and feosral 
regulations regarding fuel standards win be in place in Kansas City. Since EPA will be jpespcssable for 
enforcement of the requirements for RFG brought iniothc Kansas City area, it is essential EPA does nor 
authorize the introduction of gasoline inro the Kansas City maintenance area "which violates scste 
regulations and the SIP. 

I believe many questions remain on this issue. I hope to work with EPA and opt partMrs in £hc 
Kansas City area to find an effective. long-term solution. 




£pa£ GRAVIS 
Governor 



BGijca 



cc: 



Clyde D. Graeber, Secretary, KDHB 

Dennis Grams, Ejegjonal Admirdstraiar, Region VH 
! B, Dean Carlson, Secretary, KDOT 
j David Geiger, Division Administrator, FHWA 



Area source emissions for Missouri SIP counties 



29 165 PLATTE NA 

29 095 JACKSON NA 

29 047 CLAY NA 



29 047 CLAY 

ilHHi 

29 165 PLATTE NA 

mm 

29 095 JACKSON NA 

IBBHU 

29 047 CLAY 4953 

29 165 PLATTE NA 

(■HHHHfflBBH 

29 095 JACKSON NA 



165 PLATTE NA 



095 JACKSON NA 



25, 243-245, 2499, 32, 341, 

UBS 



047 CLAY 



NA 



29 165 PLATTE NA 

29 095 JACKSON NA 

29 047 CLAY NA 

29 165 PLATTE NA 

SSHHRHf " 

29 095 JACKSON NA 

8BBH 

29 047 CLAY 

29 165 PLATTE NA 



29 095 JACKSON NA 
29 047 CLAY NA 



165 PLATTE 25, 33-39, 417, 423, SSI, 552, 

HSOBlEHMHHBHHfl 

095 JACKSON 25, 33-39, 417, 423, 551, 552, 

047 CLAY NA 
165 PLATTE 2851 
095 JACKSON 2851 



554-556, 7 55 

mmm 

554-556, 754 



2102004000 
2102004000 
2102007000 
2102006000 
2102006000 
2401990000 
2610020000 

wbsbm 

2610020000 
2620030000 



2461800000 

hhnu 

2104002000 
2104002000 

mmmrn; 

2104004000 

mmmm 

2104007000 

hhub 

2104007000 
2104006000 

IBB 

2610030000 
2610030000 
2104008000 
2415000000 

■nan 

2415000000 
3810030000 
^«^08000 
2401008000 



0.53 52.64 
11.91 1191.10 
8.76 332.94 

mmmssm 

5.48 139.41 

SKillll 

123.93 3154.70 
4232.09 



6.86 



1.37 

wmmom 

96.25 

14.10 21.37 

131.82 199.73 

1505.65 

mmwmm 

o.oo o.ob 

Si 

2.46 2.24 

Ml 

1.39 



13.16 0.56 56.38 14.10 Industrial Fuel Oil Coinbuslion 

lilS^ - 

297.77 11.63 1162.53 290.63 Industrial Fuel Oil Combustion 

KilSli^ Caption--- < 

56.07 8.64 328.22 55.28 Industrial LPG Combustion 

mmmmmmmmmsmmmm com^n ■;.:■■■■>; 

83.65 5.87 149.33 89,60 Industrial Natural Gas Combustion 

fMll^^ Combiistiori • :: " r 

1892.82 120.96 3079.03 1847.42 Industrial Natural Gas Combustion 

Kllllflll^^ 

4172.12 0.00 0.00 Industrial Surface Coating 

19.45 8.65 1.73 24.50 Institutional/Commercial Open Burning 

, 22.37 8.22 1.64 23.29 Institutional/Commercial Open Burning 

113.93 0.00 0.00 Municipal Landfills 

71.22 17.77 26.92 89.74 On-site Incineration 



137,25 207.95 



693.17 On-site Incineration 



76.90 



0.00 0.00 Pesticide Application 

0.00 0.00 Residential CoaJ Combustion 

67.70 2.66 2.42 73.06 Residential Coal Combustion 

fiiiigiiiiiiK^ 

0.39 0.07 1.72 0.48 Residential Fuel Oil Combustion 

3.74 1.29 36.20 4.91 Residential LPG Combustion 

10.44 . 2.96 82.99 11.26 Residential LPG Combustion 

165.93 28.10- 480.31 204.39 Residential Natural Gas Combustion 

162.13 



154.12 



436.69 Residential Open Burning 



53:53 



470.00 



0.61 59.05 Residential Wood 
0.00 0.00 Solvent Cleaning 



SBillBgl^^ 



0.00 



0.00 Solvent Cleaning 



61.46 



13.34 1.70 72.75 Structure Fires 

0.00 0.00 Traffic Markings 
187.83 0.00 0.00 TraiSc Maridngs 



TOTAL (lb*./OSD| 




86,285.06 


25,971.49 


10,637.78 


82,002.52 


25,910.66 


10,999.78 




TOTAL (ton*/OSD) 




43.14 


12.99 


5.32 


41.00 


12.96 


5.50 





jul-rc-99 02 :01 m From-FED TRANSIT ADWIN +3165230927 T-28Z P. 02/03 F-S82 

STAXE OF KANSAS 

^S^' ' ^^^^ C85)23S4232 

State Capitol 2nd Floor 1^CO-74^H03 

Topckc, Kansas 66612,1590 ^^^^S ^ rjrgS 295-7973 

Office of THE Governor 

1121/25, 1999 



The Hon arah 1 KJ^rc) Browner, Administrator , 
UvS, Ejmrcnmanal Protection Agency 
401 M Street, S-W. 
Washington, D.C 2046Q 

j 

Dear Administrator Browner 
1 

By this letter, Kansas is applying to opt-In to the federal reformulated gasoline- (RF<3) program in 
Johnson County, Kansas and Wyandotte County, .Kansas. As Authorized by section 211(F)(6) of the 
federal Clean Air Act, Kansas is making application to the Administrator to apply the prohibition set forth 
in section 2UQc}(5) of the federal Clean Air Aci in Johnson Cotmfy, Kansas, and Wyandotte County, 
Kansas. As authorize by 40 CER 80,70(fcX I ara pethfomng to mdnde Johnson County, Kansas, and 
Wyandotte County, Kansas as covered areas for purposes of subparts D, E and F of 40 CFR Part SO. 
Also, I request that EPA utilize all the time allowed by Jaw before KFG is required to be introdixced in 
Johnson County, Kansas and Wyandotte County, Kansas. 

I am exercising ray prerogative as Governor to opt-in to thofsderal RFG program so the long- 
range transportation plan for Kansas City will demonstrate canfcnniiy ^vith the state rmplgrnentatipji plan 
mobile source volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions budget This ccnfonnity demonstration will 
allow transportation projects in these counties to continue under the implementation procedures crafted in 
response to Envuxmmcntal Defense Fund v. Bra-wrier. Ii lay Understanding that this will also satisfy the 
contingency plan VOC reduction requirements of the-Kausas City maintenance plan as authorized at 



64 



FR 28757^22761, May 27, 2999. 



j I also request that you remain open to considering alternatives toRFG fbr the Kansas Ciry 
metropolitan area prior to 'file January 1, 2004 *opUout? time fiarne for KFG. Much has changed since 
this lock-in dare Was established by EPA in October 1997 which causes great concern about the long-terra 
ramifications of opting into the federal KFG program. Valid publio hea lt h concerns aboui ihc KFG 
oxygenate methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) arc tang raised*! a time when studies suggest the KFG 
oxygenate n^ruircmcarmay not provide the intended VOC emission reduction benefits- Yet Kansas is 
being forced to opt-b 10 a program which may increase the potential exposure of Kansas citizens to this 
possible carcincgeiL 

I am also concerned that Kansas City may not realize all the atr quality benefits that have been 
suggested as a result of an RFG opt-in. Specifically, Kansas Ciry may not receive tuc VOC reductions 
thar have been touted by various stakeholders throughout this process to date. In fact, wc understand the 
VOC reductions could be fi^gniflcantry less, A cursory review of the growih and increased traffic 
demands of tbc Kansas Ciry area readily confirm that RFG may only be. a sxop-gap remedy to achieve 
theoretical transportation conformity. 



"73 



MISSOURI POINT SOURCE EMISSIONS (1999-2012) 
METROPOLITAN KANSAS CITY 



H 




1 




111 


m 




f&Sit 


§|§|§ 

HHUK 




.y^Paily .• 
7 ; f:f' : EmlssIons: : - 
iLllii^Sp):.:;' 


2012 NOx^lly 
.Emissions.'. 


2012 CO Daily 
Emissions 
:(lbs/OSD), 


CLAY COUNTY 
























00 




047 


12.9 






99.4 






1.43542802 


142.7 






20 


Food product 
manufacturing 


U*t f 


T17 f) 


86.3 


74.1 


1,750.0 


513.8 


440,1 


1.340834196 


2,346.5 


688.9 


590.1 


26 


Paper product 
manufacturing 


047 


16.3 


20.2 


16.9 


102.8 


109.0 


91.5 


1.333395961 


137.1 


145.4 


121.9 


27 


Printing & 
publishing 


047 


93.9 


4.2 


1.2 


DOO.O 


IO.O 


O A 


1.UoOo95585 


690.5 


1 7.7 


2.6 


28 


Chemical 
manufacturing 


047 


116.3 


6.2 


1.5 


853.2 


43.6 


10.8 


1.286791723 


1,097.9 


56.1 


13.9 


29 


Petroleum 
refining 


047 


3.4 


7.1 


1.3 


25.5 


72.4 


13.3 


1 


25.5 


72.4 


13.3 


30 


Rubber & 
plastic 

manufacturing 


047 


14.2 


0.3 


0.2 


yo.o 






1.209286804 


1 18.9 


2.6 


1.5 


32 


Stone, clay, 
glass, and 
concrete 
products 
manufacturing 


047 


4.9 


1.7 


0.4 


37.7 


25.9 


6.2 


1.704112787 


64.2 


44.1 


10.5 


34 


Fabricated 
metal products, 
except 

machinery and 

transportation 

equipment 


047 


0.2 






0.8 






1.723076923 


1.4 






36 


Electronic 

equipment & 

components, 

except 

computer 

equipment 

manufacturing 


047 


2.2 


1.0 


0.2 


13.1 


6.1 


1.0 


1.293747776 


16.9 


7.9 


1.3 


37 


Transportation 

equipment 

manufacturing 


047 


1,811.6 


121.0 


99.4 


12,758.5 


823.2 


674.9 


1.832050134 


23.374.3 


1,508.2 


1,236.5 


39 


Miscellaneous 
manufacturing 


047 


6.4 


1.2 


0.3 


54.5 


10.3 


2.3 


1.999914288 


108.9 


20.7 


4.6 



Office of the Governor 
State of Missouri 
Jefferson City 
65101 



Mel Carnahan 



STATE CAPITOL 

boom ate 

<3?3) 7EI.3222 



July 28, 1999 



Ms. Carol Browner, Administrator 
U,S. Environmental Protection Agency- 
401 M Street, S.W. 
Washington, D.C 20460 

Dear Ms. Browner 

Pursuant to Section 21 l(k)(6) of the Clean Air Act, I request the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency extend the requirement for reformulated gasoline 
to the Missouri portion of the Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Area beginning 
June 1,2000. 

Thank you for your attention to this matter. ] look forward to the successful 
implementation of this program as well as continued attainment of the federal clean 
air standards for the Kansas City area. 

If you have any further questions or concerns, please contact Mr. Stephen 
Mahfood, Director, Department of Natural Resources (573) 751 -4732. Thank you. 



Very truly yours. 




Mel Carnahan 



MC/gh 



c: Dennis Grams, EPA, Region V]f 



7<2 



49 


Electric, gas, & 
sanitary 


047 


0.5 


384.3 


6.8 


4.2 


3,076.5 


54.6 


1 1fi7mfi7fi7 
1 .OO / UJD fOf 


£ 7 


a on^. 7 


7/1 7 


50 


Wholesale 
trade - durable 
goods 


047 


11.5 


3.6 


0.8 


54.3 


19.8 


4.2 


1.474463973 


80.1 


29.2 


6.2 


51 


Wholesale 
trade - 
nondurable 
goods 


047 


0.0 


0.1 




0.0 


0.6 




1.474463973 


0.0 


0.9 




72 


Personal 
services 


047 


1,7 






8.8 






1.238509202 


10.9 






75 


Automotive 
repair, services 
and parking 


047 


34.4 


0.3 


0.2 


245.3 


1.8 


1.5 


1.513755098 


371.3 


2.7 


2.3 


80 


Health services 


047 


0.0 


1.8 


0.4 


0.2 


7.6 


1.9 


1.334045204 


0.2 


10.1 


2.5 


CLAY COUNTY TOTALS 




2,447.7 


639.2 


203.7 


16,741.9 


4,729.1 


1,305.8 




28,593.1 


6,812.6 


2,081.8 


i 






















JACKSON COUNTY 
























07 


Agricultural 
services 


095 




0.0 






0.4 




1.227818675 




0.5 




14 


Mining and 
quarrying of 
nonmetallfc 
minerals, 
except fuels 


095 


0.8 


18.0 


12.5 


6.4 


145.5 


112.7 


1.216704289 


7.8 


177.1 


137.1 


17 


Construction - 
special trade 
contractors 


095 


0.5 


0.1 


0.3 


7.4 


1.8 


4.6 


1.195020335 


8.8 


2.1 


5.6 


20 


Food product . 
manufacturing 


095 


401.4 


97.1 


278.8 


1,804.8 


489.2 


1,519.4 


1.340834196 


o a on n 


ooo.y 


o m7 T 


24 


Lumber & wood 

products, 

except 

furniture, 

manufacturing 


095 


30.5 


0.6 


0.9 


188.5 


3.9 


■6.3 


1.920867113 


362.1 


7.5 


12.2 


25 


Furniture & 
fixture 

manufacturing 


095 


3.8 






29.2 






1.974052932 


57.7 






26 


Paper product 
manufacturing 


095 


120.2 


4.4 


2.7 


765.1 


31.1 


18.6 


1.333395961 


1,020.1 


41.5 


24.8 


27 


Printing & 
publishing 


095 


388.8 


9.0 


4.0 


2,770.6 


61.5 


29.0 


1.086895585 


3,011.3 


66.9 


31.6 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.5 Appendix E 



Letters from Missouri and Kansas State Governors 
Responding to RFG program. 

71 



28 


Chemical 
manufacturing 


095 


78.9 


59.5 


30.9 


921.5 


398.5 


196.9 


1.286791723 


1,185.8 


512.8 


253.4 


29 


Petroleum 
refining 


095 


10.5 


49.0 


42.2 


65.7 


444.5 


364.5 


1 


65.7 


444.5 


364.5 


30 


Rubber & 
plastic 

manufacturing 


095 


8.8 


1.1 


1.7 


67.6 


8.0 


12.9 


1.209286804 


81.7 


9.7 


15.6 


32 


Stone, clay, 
glass, and 
concrete 
products 
manufacturing 


095 


29.4 


1,193.3 


316.1 


168.6 


6,563.0 


1,738.5 


1,704112787 


287.3 


11.184.1 


2,962.5 


33 


Primary metal 

industries 

manufacturing 


095 


81.4 


288.2 


242.8 


479.5 


1,578.0 


1,320.3 


1.860995458 


892.3 


2,936.6 


2,457.1 


34 


PaKrina tori 

metal products, 
except 

machinery and 
transportation 
equipment 


095 


250.3 


69.7 


34.5 


1,574.8 


477.1 


229.8 


1.723076923 


2.713.5 


822.1 


396.0 


35 


Machines & 
computer 
equipment 
manufacturing 


095 


23.1 


2.9 


0.4 


238.9 


30.0 


4.2 


1.095952207 


261.9 


32.9 


4.6 


36 


Electronic 

equipment & 

components, 

except 

computer 

equipment 

manufacturing 


095 


19.1 


49.3 


21.4 


130.5 


300.0 


131.6 


1.293747776 


168.8 


388.2 


170.2 


37 


Transportation 

equipment 

manufacturing 


095 


40.8 


0.9 


0.1 


297.5 


4.9 


0.4 


1.832050134 


545.0 


9.0 


0.8 


38 


Technical 
instrument 
manufacturing 


095 


lU.O 


u.y 


U.I 


70 O 
f Z.tJ 


C Q 

o.o 


n a 


1. 486406236 


108.2 


8.6 


0,7 


42 


Motor freight 
transportation 
& warehousing 


095 


0.2 






1.3 






1.358181141 


1.7 






43 


United States 
Postal Service 


095 


0.0 


0.3 


0.3 


0.1 


0.8 


0.6 


1.139498887 


0.1 


1.0 


0.7 


48 


Communication 
s 


095 




7.2 


3.1 




275.4 


118.5 


1.257965057 




346.4 


149.0 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



This page left intentionally blank. 



70 



49 


Electric, gas, & 

sanitary 

services 


095 


286.2 


21,986.4 


973.2 


1.919.5 


158.792.6 


7.665.3 


1.367036767 


2,624.1 


217,075.3 


10,478.7 


50 


Wholesale 
trade - durable 
goods 


095 


6.8 


0.1 


0.0 


37.5 


0.3 


0.1 


1.474463973 


55.3 


0.4 


0.1 


51 


Wholesale 
trade - 
nondurable 
goods 


095 


38.1 


1.9 


0.5 


209.4 


5.3 


1.3 


1.474463973 


308.8 


7.9 


1.9 


70 


Hotels & other 
lodging places 


095 


Q.6 


12.8 


3.4 


6.9 


154.4 


41.2 


1.242387333 


8.5 


191.9 


51.2 


72 


Personal 
services 


095 


91.9 


0.3 


0.2 


650.2 


2.1 


1.3 


1.238509202 


805.3 


2.6 


1.5 


73 


Business 
services 


095 


8.6 


18.5 


3.7 


67.2 


145.4 


29.0 


1.217944979 


81.8 


177.1 


35.4 


75 


Automotive 
repair, services 
and parking 


095 


11.6 


1.3 


0.2 


89.4 


9,0 


1.3 


1.513755098 


135.3 


13.7 


2.0 


80 


Health services 


095 


8.4 


83.5 


28.5 


53;6 


523.5 


191.7 


1.334045204 


71.5 


698.3 


255.7 


82 


Educational 
services 


095 


0.3 


12.7 


3.1 


1.4 


55.1 


13.3 


1.277193635 


1.8 


70.4 


17.0 


84 


Museums, art 
galleries, and 
botanical & 
zoological 
gardens 


095 


0.0 


0.0 


0,0 


0.1 


0.1 


0.2 


1.363636364 


0.1 


0.1 


0.3 


86 


Membership 
organizations 


095 


1.3 


0.4 




8.1 


2.4 




1.266277585 


10.2 


3.1 




87 


Engineering, 
accounting and 
other ' 
professional 
services 


095 


1.9 


16.7 


3.0 


14.1 


122.1 


22.0 


1.380471059 


19.4 


168.6 


30.4 


JACKSON COUNTY TOTALS 




1,954.7 


23,986.2 


2,008.5 


12,647.9 


170,631.8 


13,776.1 


45.7 


17,321.9 


236,056.5 


19,897.9 


I 
\ 
























PLATTE COUNTY 
























27 


Printing & 
publishing 


165 


63.2 


0.0 


0.0 


443.2 


0.1 


0.0 


1.086895585 


481.7 


0.1 


0.0 


29 


Petroleum 
refining 


165 


0.5 


6.3 


1.7 


4.9 


59.1 


15.8 


1 


4.9 


59.1 


15.8 


30 


Rubber & 
plastic 

manufacturing 


165 


99.0 


1.2 


1.0 


645.4 


7.8 


6.5 


1.209286804 


780.5 


9.5 


7.9 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.4 Appendix D 



On-road emissions and MOBILE6 parameters. 



MOBILE6 inputs: default vehicle age distribution; 7.2 RVP gasoline in 1999; 7.0 RVP 
gasoline in 2012; refueling emissions not included (refueling emissions are included in area 
source inventory) 



Year 


1999 


2012 


2020 


Non-local DVMT 


37,575,888 


47,925,799 


53,653,284 


Local DVMT 


8,397,659 


10,710,712 


11,990,721 


Total DVMT 


45,973,547 


58,636,511 


65,644,005 




VOC (tons/osd) 


92.3 


41.2 


30.6 


NOx (tons/osd) 


152.9 


67.2 


36.5 


CO (tons/osd) 


1092.4 


579.0 


526.2 



conversion factor: 1.10 x 10" 6 tons/gram 



69 



32 


Stone, clay, 
glass, and 
concrete 
products 
manufacturing 


165 


0.5 


25.6 


6.4 


3.2 


158.6 


39.6 


1.704112787 


5.5 


270.2 


67.5 


37 


Transportation 

equipment 

manufacturing 


165 


32.2 


5.3 


3.8 


175.4 


28.7 


20.8 


1.832050134 


321.3 


52.5 


38.2 


45 


Air 

transportation 


165 


29.1 


57.5 


24.0 


156.1 


308.4 


131.0 


1.463844001 


228.6 


451.5 


191.7 


49 


Electric, gas, & 

sanitary 

services 


165 


81.4 


6,440.7 


681.3 


482.9 


38,512.4 


4,128.3 


1.367036767 


660.2 


52,647.9 


5,643.6 


51 


Wholesale 
trade - 
nondurable 
goods 


165 


79.8 


4.5 


9.1 


438.2 


24.9 


49.7 


1.474463973 


646.1 


36.7 


73.3 


72 


Personal 
services 


165 


4.6 


0.0 


0.0 


29.6 


0.1 


0.1 


1 .238509202 


36.6 


0.2 


0.1 


73 


Business 
services 


165 


0.1 


3.4 


0.8 


0.5 


14.4 


3.5 


1.217944979 


0.6 


17.5 


4.3 


75 


Automotive 
repair, services 
and parking 


165 


16.5 


1.2 


1.0 


120.4 


8.7 


7.5 


1.513755098 


182.3 


13.2 


11.3 


PLATTE COUNTY TOTALS 




407.0 


6,545.7 


729.2 


2,499.9 


39,123.3 


4,402.9 




3,348.2 


53,558.5 


6,053.7 



TOTALS (LBS/OSD) 




4,809.4 


31,171.2 


2,941.4 


31,889.7 


214,484.2 


19,484.9 




49,263.2 


296,427.5 


28,033.5 


TOTALS (TONS/OSD) 




2.4 


15.6 


1.5 


15.9 


107.2 


9.7 




24.6 


148.2 


14.0 











1999 Kansas City Regional Emissions Inventory: Nonroad Emissions 



Railroad Equipment 














Clay 


0.0 


0.0 


20.0 


20.0 


40.0 


44.0 


Jackson 


20.0 


0.0 


80.0 


60.0 


180.0 


184.0 


Platte 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


20.0 


20.0 


Totals ; 


: 20.0 


2-- o : q 






240.0 


:;^248:Ci 


Total Nonroad -ifW i C 
Emissions ; ■"■ 

(lbs70SD) ^;|;l^f:f;. ;:4 


1,057:1; _ 








5&7;361 .8 ; : 




Total Nonroad ^ ; 
Emissions' .^na:|f;-^ 


^205 ,; 













/ 



1999 Kansas City Regional Emissions Inventory: Nonroad Emissions 





1999 


2012 


1999 


2012 


1999 


2012 


Category/ 


VOC 


VOC 


NOx 


NOx 


CO 


CO 


County 


lbs/day 


lbs/day 


lbs/day 


lbs/day 


lbs/day 


lbs/day 


Agricultural Equipment 












Clay 


200.0 


116.0 


1,640.0 


1,148.0 


960.0 


1,052.0 


Jackson 


240.0 


136.0 


2,040.0 


1,416.0 


1,200.0 


1,300.0 


Platte 


340.0 


192.0 


2,900.0 


2,008.0 


1,700.0 


1,852.0 












Jv -'S f 3i860.0 




Aircraft 














Clay 


101.5 


131.2 


15.3 


19.8 


2,828.5 


3,654.2 


Jackson 


106.7 


138.1 


16.1 


20.8 


2,971.4 


3,846.6 


Platte 


1,454.6 


1,933.0 


4,023.3 5,347.4 

WSKSBK£$$8KB& 


8,282.8 


11,002.4 


Airport Equipment 












Clay 


0.0 


0.0 


20.0 


20.0 


40.0 


44.0 


Jackson 


0.0 


0.0 


20.0 


20.0 


40.0 


40.0 


Platte 


100.0 


40.0 


480.0 


392.0 


820.0 


984.0 












: : :-''1^5oO;0; 




Commercial Marine Vessels 












Clay 


6.7 


6.7 


176.6 


176.6 


19.5 


19.5 


Jackson 


9.3 


9.3 


244.3 


244.3 


26.9 


26.9 


Platte 


18.3 


18.3 


477.7 


All! 


52.7 


52.7 










fp^:^ : i898:6^ 






Construction Equipment 












Clay 


1,280.0 


548.0 


6,820.0 


4,664.0 


8,280.0 


7,520.0 


Jackson 


5,820.0 


2,512.0 


31,060.0 


21,268.0 


37,700.0 


34,212.0 


Platte 


980.0 


428.0 


5,240.0 


3,584.0 


6,380.0 


5,780.0 


Totals 


b;o8o:o 


3488.0^ 


43^20.0. 


, 29,516.0 


52,360.0 


47,5121) 


Industrial Equipment 












Clay 


320.0 


148.0 


2,240.0 


2,484,0 


8,660.0 


8,796.0 


Jackson 


1,020.0 


484.0 


7,020.0 


7,784.0 


26,460.0 


26,988.0 


Platte 


60.0 


36.0 


420.0 


448.0 


1,360.0 


1,420.0 


Totals 


1,400.0 


668.0 


9,680.0 


10,716.0 


36,480.0 


37,204.0 



/-l/l 



1999 Kansas City Regional Emissions Inventory: Nonroad Emissions 


Commercial Lawn & Garden Equipment 










Clay 


2,340.0 


1,292.0 


580.0 


580.0 


33,360.0 


41,788.0 


Jackson 


13,580.0 


7,496.0 


3,320.0 


3,400.0 


193,820.0 


242,728.0 


Platte 


800.0 


432.6 


200.0 


200.0 


11,320.0 


14,192.0 


Totals 


16;720.0 


9,220.0 


4;100;0 


- 4,180.0 


238,500.0 


298,708.0 




Residential Lawn & Garden Equipment 










Clay 


1,060.0 


596.0 


60.0 


80.0 


15,980.0 


19,548.0 


Jackson 


4,620.0 


9 RS^O n 


280.0 


324.0 


69,300.0 


84,724.0 


Platte 


400.0 


99n n 


on n 

zu.u 


Zu.U 


D,o4U.U 




Totals 


|:^^050^||^ 












Commercial Equipment 












Clay 


920.0 


644.0 


800.0 


932.0 


22,340.0 


32,652.0 


Jackson 


3,420.0 


9 AAC\ n 


2,980.0 


3,512.0 


84,040.0 


122,748.0 


Platte 

Totals . V;/vv> 


280.0 


loo.U 


Z4U.U 

r "il4". ; YYon n ■ 


zo4.U 


a. Ton n 
: 113,100.0 ; 


Q qoq n 
1p5,22oi0 


Pleasure Craft 














Clay 


240.0 


176.0 


20.0 


20.0 


520.0 


524.0 


Jackson 


220.0 


1 RPi n 
IOD.U 


20.0 


20.0 


460.0 


468.0 


Platte 


120.0 


n 

yo.u 


U.U 


zu.O 


ooa n 


OD/1 n 
Zo4.U 


Totals 






■ ' ''-a n n ■' ■ ■'- 
40.0 


60.0: 


v 1 f 260X) 




Railroad Locomotives 












Clay 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


Jackson 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


Platte 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


0.0 


Totals 




0:0 


0.0 J 


3?; : ';:' : ^o.6,^-: 


0,0 




Recreational Equipment 












Clay 


140.0 


124.0 


20.0 


20.0 


3,140.0 


3,512.0 


Jackson 


560.0 


548.0 


80.0 


60.0 


9,260.0 


10,236.0 


Platte 


280.0 


284.0 


20.0 


20.0 


2,960.0 


3,208.0 


Totals 


980.0 


956.0 


120:0 


100.0 


15,360.0 


16,956.0 



3.4.7 Appendix G 



June 28, 2002 Public Hearing Comments and Responses. 



87 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



COMMENTS AND RESPONSES ON 
PROPOSED REVISIONS TO THE 
KANSAS CITY OZONE MAINTENANCE PLAN 

AND 

RECOMMENDATION FOR ADOPTION 

On June 28, 2002, the Missouri Air Conservation Commission held a public hearing 
concerning the 2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan. The following is a summary of 
comments received and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources' corresponding 
responses. Any changes to the proposed maintenance plan are identified in the responses to 
the comments. 

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Air Pollution Control Program recommends 
that the commission adopt the plan action as amended. If the commission adopts this plan 
action, it will be the department's intention to submit this plan action to the U.S. 
Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for inclusion in the Missouri State Implementation 
Plan. 

SUMMARY OF COMMENT: The department's Air Pollution Control Program received 
comments from one source, the EPA. 

COMMENT: The EPA commented that the plan should affirmatively state that since the 
emissions inventory will be maintained below the 1999 level, the National Ambient Air 
Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone is maintained for another ten years through 2012. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program changed the language in the Maintenance Plan because of this comment. The 
phrase —should be — is replaced with — will be - in the Demonstration of Continued 
Attainment section. 

COMMENT: The EPA asked if the ambient air quality would be monitored over the next 
ten-year period of the revised plan. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's .Air Pollution Control 
Program has changed the language in the Maintenance Plan because of this comment. An 
affirmative statement was added to clarify that the State will monitor the ambient air quality 
over the next ten years. The primary tracking plan for the Kansas City Metropolitan Area 
(KCMA) consists of continuous ozone monitoring. The ongoing regional transportation 
planning process carried out by the Mid America Regional Council (MARC), in coordination 
with the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE), the Missouri Department 
of Natural Resources and EPA, will serve as a secondary means of tracking mobile source 
Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) and Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) precursor emissions into 
the future. Since revisions to the region's transportation improvement programs are prepared 
every two years, and must go through a transportation conformity finding, this process will 
be used to periodically review progress toward meeting the vehicle miles traveled (VMT) 
and mobile source emissions projections in this maintenance plan. 

COMMENT: The EPA commented that the plans should affirmatively state the motor 
vehicle emissions budgets. A proposed budget is not adequate. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program has changed the language in the Maintenance Plan because of this comment. The 



88 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



word — proposed ~ under the Emission Inventory and Motor Vehicle Budgets section, was 
removed. 

COMMENT: In the section concerning contingency measures, Missouri commits to a 12- 
month deadline for implementing contingency measures after a violation of the standard 
occurs. After considering the past history and the lengthy time it took to implement control 
measures in response to violations of the standards in the 1990s, a process, a schedule and 
pertinent criteria that would be used to select and implement a contingency measure should 
be added to the maintenance plan. The commitment is to implement transportation control 
measures, yet the list contains other types of possible control measures. The EPA asked what 
contingency measure is the department's Air Pollution Control Program actually committing 
to and what contingency measures will actually be implemented to promptly correct 
violations of the ozone standard that may occur during the period of the maintenance plan. 
EPA also provided pertinent information being considered by Illinois, Indiana, and 
Wisconsin for the Chicago area maintenance plan for Missouri's consideration. The EPA 
noted that contingency measures with a two level response were included in those plans. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program has changed the language in the Maintenance Plan because of this comment. The 
Contingency Measures section was rewritten to include a two level response after 
implementation of the federal mobile source rule. From now until late 2004, existing control 
measures along with any necessary contingency measures will control the area's emissions. 
In 2005 to 2012, the mobile emission reductions from federal regulations are counted on for a 
substantive reduction in mobile emission levels. These projected reductions originate with 
the projected future federal rules. Upon implementation of these future rules, substantive 
reductions in the amount of contribution from Mobile sources to the total emissions of the 
area will occur. The process for identifying effective emission reduction strategies will 
require more specialized study and modeling to predict reductions and to recommend control 
strategies; if additional reductions are necessary. 

The process after 2004 will be the use of a Level I response. This would occur in the event 
that the ozone NAAQS is exceeded, or if VOC or NOx emissions increase more than 5 
percent above the levels contained in the attainment year (1999) emission inventory. To 
facilitate the emissions trends analysis, Missouri commits to compiling VOC and NOx 
emissions inventories every three years for the duration of the maintenance plan. The EPA 
does not require a state to implement contingency measures when occasional exceedances are 
recorded. Missouri will work cooperatively with KDHE and MARC to conduct a thorough 
analysis to determine if emission trends are likely to continue. If the trend is determined to 
continue, evaluation of what and where control measures are needed as well as the level of 
emission reduction needed, to avoid a violation of NAAQS. The study shall be completed 
within nine months. If deemed necessary, control measures will be adopted within 12 
months of determination. 

Level II response will be implemented or triggered when a violation of the one-hour ozone 
NAAQS is measured at a monitoring site for the maintenance area. Missouri will work 
cooperatively with KDHE and MARC to conduct a thorough analysis to determine 
appropriate measures to address the cause of the violation. The analysis shall be completed 
within six months. Selected measures shall be adopted within 12 months and implemented 
as expeditiously as practicable, taking into consideration the ease of implementation and the 
technical and economic feasibility of selected measures. No contingency measure will be 
implemented without providing for full public participation. 

89 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



A process, a schedule, and pertinent criteria are outlined in the following Table. 



Year 


Contingency Measure Trigger 


Action to be Taken 


List of Contingency Measures 


2003 - 2004 


Violation occurs anywhere within the 
maintenance area. 


Depending upon the degree and nature of the 
transgression, the department will begin 
implementation of transportation control 
measures sufficient to achieve at least a five- 
percent reduction in area wide emissions 


Statewide NOx rule (MO) 

Federal Non-road Engine Standards 

One or more of the following will be considered for 

implementation: 

1 ) industrial emission offsets of 1 . 1 5 to 1 ; 

2) stationary source controls for NOx and VOC ; 

3) Stage II Vapor Recovery program at gasoline refueling 
stations; 

4) enhanced vehicle emission reductions programs; 

5) alternate fuel programs for fleet vehicle operations; 

6) vehicle anti -tampering programs; 

7) other transportation control measures; 

8) vehicle inspection and maintenance program; 

9) VOC controls on minor sources, and; 

10) the department will further review and evaluate the 
current VOC rules to see if they need to be tightened, 
changed or modified. 




Level I Trigger 

• The KCMA NOx or VOC emissions 
inventories for 1999 increase more 
than 5% above the levels included in 
the 3-year emissions inventories 
updates. 


MO will work cooperatively with KS to evaluate 
the exceedances, or determine if adverse 
emissions trends are likely to continue. If so, the 
States will determine what and where controls 
may are required, as well as level of emissions 
reductions needed, to avoid a violation of the 
NAAQS. The study shall be completed within 9 
months. If necessary, control measures shall be 
adopted within 18 months of determination. 


Point Source Measures 

• NOx SIP Call Phase II (non-utility) 

• Reinstate requirements for Offsets and/or LAER 

• Apply RACT to smaller existing sources 

• Tighten RACT for existing sources covered by 
EPACTGs. 

• Expanded geographic coverage of current point 
source measures 

• MACT controls for industrial sources 

• Other measures to be identified 


2005-2012 






Mobile Source Measures 

• Tier 2 Vehicle Standards and Low Sulfur Fuel 

• Heavy Duty Diesel Standards and Low Sulfur 
Diesel Fuel 

• TCMs, including, but not limited to, area-wide 
rideshare programs, telecommuting, transit 
improvements, and traffic flow improvements. 

• High-enhanced I/M (OBDII) 

• California Engine Standards 

• Other measures to be identified 




Level II Trigger 

• A violation of the Ozone 
N AAQS at any monitoring 
station in the KCMA. 


MO will work cooperatively with KS to conduct 
a thorough analysis to determine appropriate 
measures to address the cause of the violation. 
Analysis shall be completed within 6 months. 
Selected measures shall be adopted within 18 
months and implemented as expeditiously as 
practicable, taking into consideration the ease of 
implementation and the technical and economic 
feasibility of selected measures. 


Area Source Measures 

• California Architectural/Industrial Maintenance 
(AIM) 

• California Commercial and Consumer Products 

• Broader geographic applicability of existing 
measures 

• California Off-road Engine Standards 

• Other measures to be identified 



90 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



COMMENT: The EPA asked what emissions models were used to construct the 1999 on- 
road and off-road mobile source emissions inventory. If MOBILES was used, the EPA 
believes the State must commit to revising the motor vehicles emissions budgets within a 
short time period. In addition, the EPA asked, if the Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) 
growth factors were used to project emission in 2012. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program changed the Maintenance Plan language because of this comment. The EPA 
MOBILE6 model was used to develop the on-road emissions. The parameters of the 
MOBILE6 model were used in the development of mobile emissions added to the Mobile 
Source Emissions section. MOBILES was not used to calculate mobile emissions. In 
addition, a statement stating that MOBILES and MOBILE5B were not used was added to the 
section. The BEA growth factors were used because they are derived from EPA's Economic 
Growth Analysis System (EGAS) software. BEA growth factors are derived for each Source 
Classification Code (SCC) and County combination. The Point Sources Emissions section 
mentioning BEA growth factors was rewritten to affirmatively state the use of BEA growth 
factors. 

COMMENT: The EPA commented that in addition to the maintenance plan that is required 
when an area requests re-designation, the Clean Air Act (CAA) also requires a revised 
maintenance plan for the second ten year period. The prior maintenance plan was approved 
in 1 992, not 1 991 . This plan could be referred to as a 2003 Plan, not a 2002 Plan. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program changed the Maintenance Plan language because of this comment. An effort to 
correct the use of referencing the 1992 maintenance plan as the 1991 maintenance plan was 
made in the 1992 draft submitted to public review on June 28, 2002. Reluctance to correct 
direct quotes and outside department communications has allowed for some inconsistency 
when referring to the 1 992 plan. The sections will be rewritten to correct or more clearly 
state the plan was a 1992 plan and not the 1991 plan. The department has historically 
identified plans by referring to the MACC adopted date and, therefore, will refer to this plan 
using that date. 

COMMENT: The EPA commented that the affirmative statement in the Provision for the 
Continued Operation of the Air Monitoring Network section states that emission inventories 
will be updated every three years throughout the 10 year period of the revised maintenance 
plan and should be moved to the appropriate section. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program changed the Maintenance Plan language because of this comment. The 
commitment to renew the emission inventory would better serve the reader in the emission 
inventory update section. To aid the reader in finding such required information, numbered 
headings have been added to specific required sections. 

COMMENT: The EPA commented that the revised maintenance plan relies on emission 
controls required by existing federal or state rules, those rules should be identified. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program changed the Maintenance Plan language because of this comment. Control 
measures that are required by existing federal or state rules have been identified. The 
existing federal and state rules that are enacted as control measures, or those rules the plan is 
relying on to show attainment, have been added to the Demonstration of Continued 



91 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Attainment section. The Maintenance Plan shows that, without adding any new control 
measures to the KC Maintenance Plan, ozone precursor emissions will be reduced between 
2000 and 2012. These reductions will be realized through a combination of already adopted 
measures and programs affecting mobile sources, stationary sources, and transportation 
systems. The Kansas City Metropolitan Area will rely on the control programs listed to 
demonstrate maintenance of the one-hour ozone standard through 2012. A list of the existing 
federal and state control measure has been included in the actual plan. 

COMMENT: The EPA believes some adjustments can be made that will help current and 
future readers understand this document. 

RESPONSE AND EXPLANATION OF CHANGE: The department's Air Pollution Control 
Program has changed the Maintenance Plan language because of this comment. To improve 
the readability of the document a numbered outline has been added to the table of contents 
and to each heading. The appendix, acronyms, and table lists were moved to the back of the 
document. The conformity and administrative requirement sections have been separated. 
The definition of some technical terms has been expanded to make them more 
understandable to a wider range of readers. In addition, the locations of critical items of the 
maintenance plan are identified in the Table of Contents section. 



92 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.8 Appendix H 



MACC Adoption Certification 



93 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Pursuant to 643.055 RSMo, the Missouri Air Conservation Commission has 
determined that this action is needed to have a U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency approved State Implementation Plan. 

Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan is hereby adopted by the Missouri Air 
Conservation Commission this 25th day of July, 2002. 




, Chairman 



Vice-Chairman 




, Member 



94 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.9 Appendix I 



KS and MO Emissions from New Population and Employment Forecasts. 



95 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



96 



Kansas City Regional Emissions Inventory 
August 26, 2002 



Note: Area and on-road mobile source estimates for 2012 are based on new draft population and 
employment forecasts approved by the MARC Technical Forecast Committee on July 1 1, 2002. 
Forecasts have not been adopted by the MARC Board. 





VOC emissions 


NOx emissions 


CO emissions 




1999 


2012 


1999 


2012 


1999 




2012 




KS 


MO 


REG 


KS 


MO 


REG 


KS 


MO 


REG 


KS 


MO 


REG 


KS 


MO 


REG 


KS 


MO 


REG 


Area 


46.8 


43.1 


89.9 


57.9 


54.3 


112.1 


10.3 


13.0 


23,3 


12.2 


13.8 


26.0 


19.6 


5.3 


24.9 


23.2 


5.5 


28.7 


Point 


12,3 


15.9 


28.3 


14.8 


24.6 


39.4 


31.9 


107.2 


139.1 


39.0 


148.2 


187.2 


4.6 


9.7 


14.3 


5.3 


14.0 


19.3 


On-road mobile 


92,3 


92.3 


45.5 


45.5 


152.9 


152.9 


74.2 


74.2 


1092.4 


1092.4 


639.4 


639.4 


Off-road mobile 


21.4 


21.6 


43.0 


11.8 


12.9 


24.7 


54.0 


54.9 


108.9 


40.5 


45.5 


86.0 


288.0 


286.4 


574.4 


357.3 


354.5 


711.8 


TOTAL 


253.6 


221.7 


424.2 


373.5 


1706.0 


1399.3 



Kansas City Regional Emissions Inventory 
August 26, 2002 



Note: Area and on-road mobile source estimates for 201 2 are based on new draft population and 
employment forecasts approved by the MARC Technical Forecast Committee on July 1 1, 2002. 
Forecasts have not been adopted by the MARC Board. 



TABLE I - VOC Emissions 





1999 


2012 


% change 
1999-2012 


tons/OSD 


% of total 


tons/OSD 


% of total 


Area 


89.9 


35.5% 


112.1 


50.6% 


24.7% 


Point 


28.3 


11.1% 


39.4 


17.8% 


39.5% 


On-road mobile 


92.3 


36.4% 


45.5 


20.5% 


-50.8% 


Off-road mobile 


43.0 


17.0% 


24.7 


11.1% 


-42.7% 


TOTAL 


253.6 


221.7 


-12.6% 



TABLE II - NOx Emissions 





1999 


2012 


% change 
1999-2012 


tons/OSD 


% of total 


tons/OSD 


% of total 


Area 


23.3 


5.5% 


26.0 


7.0% 


11.7% 


Point 


139.1 


32.8% 


187.2 


50.1% 


34.5% 


On-road mobile 


152.9 


36.0% 


74.2 


19.9% 


-51.4% 


Off-road mobile 


108.9 


25.7% 


86.0 


23.0% 


-21.0% 


TOTAL 


424.2 


373.5 


-12.0% 



TABLE III - CO Emissions 





1999 


2012 


% change 
1999-2012 


tons/OSD 


% of total 


tons/OSD 


% of total 


Area 


24.9 


1.5% 


28.7 


2.1% 


15.5% 


Point 


14.3 


0.8% 


19.3 


1.4% 


34.8% 


On-road mobile 


1092.4 


64.0% 


639.4 


45.7% 


-41.5% 


Off-road mobile 


574.4 


33.7% 


711.8 


50.9% 


23.9% 


TOTAL 


1706.0 


1399.3 


-18.0% 



Kansas City Regional Mobile Source VOC Emissions 1999-2012 




.1999 2010 2012 

Year 



Kansas City Regional Mobile Source NOx Emissions 1999-2012 



152.9 



152.9 



Current NOx budget: 132.4 tons/day 

Budget was set using MOBILES outputs; 1999 emissions estimates 
exceed budget because they were derived using MOBILE6, 




Proposed NOx budget: 97.8 tons/day 

Requires region to achieve at least 70% of the NOx emissions 
reduction expected between 1999 and 2012. 



Population/ 
Employment 
Forecast 
Used 



J:iM ; ift ^^^^^^^^^ 





1999 



2010 
Year 



2012 



3.4.10 



Appendix J 



October 24, 2002 Public Hearing Notice 
and Certification of Publication of the Notice. 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



102 



AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 



NEWS PRESS 



MO . DEPT . NAT . RESOURCES 
PO BOX 176 

JEFFERSON CITY MO 65102 



REFERENCE: 24019 

115446 EMISSIONS BANKING 

County of Buchanan 
State of Missouri 

I, LaVonda Burgess-Mayhew, being duly sworn 
according to law, state that I am the Classified 
Advertising Supervisor of the St. Joseph 
News-Press, a daily newspaper of general 
circulation in the county of Buchanan, where 
located; which has been admitted to the Post 
fice as second class matter in the city of St. 
/seph, the city of publication; which newspaper 
_as been published regularly and consecutively for 
a period of three years and has a list of bona 
fide subscribers voluntarily engaged as such who h 
stated price for a subscription for a definite 
period of time, and that such newspaper has 
complied with the provisions of Section 493.050 
Revised Statutes of Missouri, 1949. The affixed 
notice appeared in said newspaper on the following 
date : 



PUBLISHED ON: 09/21 



H5THER JONES 
^^iS^^'Norny Seal 
STATE OP MISSOURI 
Buchanan County 
l 3ir ? iS£i0n E *? ir6 * ^ 23, 2004 



TOTAL COST: 
FILED ON: 



931 . 00 
09/24/02 



AD SPACE: 532 LINE 



'Signed) 





bscribed and sworn to -before me this 
/M/L day of ^ f ^^AJ 2 0_j2^ 




.Notary Public 



(Published in the St. Joseph News-Press Saturday. 09/21/02) 

MISSOURI AJR CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARING 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO— The. Missouri Air Conservation \ 
Commission will hold a public hearing on Emissions Banking 
and Trading, Restriction of Emissions of Lead from Specific 
Lead Smelter-Refinery Installations, Operating Permit 
Program Deficiencies, Maintenance Plan (or the SL Louis 
Ozone Nanattainment Area, SL Louis Mobile Source 
Emission Budget for the St. Louis Ozone Nonattainment 
Area, Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan, and other 
issues on Thursday, October 24, 2002. The Public Hearing 
will begin at 9 am. at the Traveler's Inn Christian Bed & 
Breakfast, Ballroom, 301 W.Washington, Kirksville, Missouri. 
The commission will hear testimony related to the following 
rule actions. 



* 10 CSR 10-6.060 (amendment) Construction Permits 
Required 

This proposed amendment will remove the offset and 
banking provisions from this rule and add references to 
new rule, 10 CSR 10-6.410 Emissions Banking and 
Trading to avoid duplicative requirements. 

* 10 CSR 10-6.410 (new rule) Emissions Banking and 
Trading 

This new rule was developed in accordance with 643.220 
RSMo and outlines an emissions banking and trading pro- 
gram for criteria pollutants and their precursors. The goal 
of this program is to achieve and maintain the National 
Ambient Air Quality Standards in nonattainment and main- 
tenance areas in the state of Missouri. 

Banking and tracing programs allow facilities to earn emis- 
sions reduction credits by emitting below the applicable 
standard. The emission reduction credits can be banked 
for later use or traded or sold to a dffieremlactfity. An envi- 
ronmental contribution of 3% will be subtracted from the 
bank of credits each year. These programs are both envi- 
ronmentally and economically beneficial in nonattainment 
and maintenance areas. 

* 10 CSR 10-6.120 jarnendment) Restrictton of Emissions 
of Lead From Specific Lead Smelter-Refinery Installations. 

This proposed amendment was requested by the Doe Run 
Company for the Resource Recycling facility. It will lower 
the total daily throughput Emit for the blast furnace and 
raise the total dairy throughput limit for the rotary mett and 
reverbatory furnaces. There will be no net lead emission 
increase as a result of this amendmenL 

* 10 CSR 10-5.170 (arnendment) Control of Odors From 
Processing of Animal Matter 

This proposed arnendment will correct an incorrect rule 
reference. 

* 10 CSR 10-6.065 (amendment) Operating Permits 

This proposed amendment addresses deficiencies in 
Missouri's Title V program identified by the Sierra Club and 
the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Failure 
to adopt these amendments may cause vie EPA to with- 
draw Missouri's Trtte V program. 

* Maintenance Plan for the St Louis Ozone nonattainment 
Area 

The I Department of Natural Resources' Air Pollution 
Control Program has prepared a maintenance plan for the 
SL Louts area to proceed with a redesignation request 
The St Louts area is currently designated under the fed- 
eral Clean Air Act as a moderate nonattairiment area for 
ground level ozone. The area is expected to attain the 
one-hour ozone standard this year. The ozone season 
begins on April 1st and ends on October 31st of each year. 
The redesignation request is based on three years of no 
violations of the standard during the period 2000-2002. 

A maintenance plan is required before an area can be 
redesignated to attainment status. The maintenance plan 
outlines how over the next ten years the area will maintain 
air quality that meets the national ambient air quality stan- 
dard. When areas are redesignated from nonattainment to 
attainment they are commonly referred to as "mainte- 
nance areas". Maintenance areas are considered to be 
attainment areas since the air quality meets the national 
ambient air quality standard. Once attainment is achieved, 
the area must continue to demonstrate, (maintain) attain- 
ment for at least -10- years after the U.S. Environmental 
Protection AgeTHpy^ "Officially approves the redesignation 
request. The maintenance plan includes an updated area 
'emissions inventory, emissions growth projections, contin- 
gency measures, it identifies the control measures in place 
that will be relied on to maintain the air quality and it pro- 
vides for continued operation of the monitoring network. 

" SL Louis Mobile Source Emission Budget for the St. 
Louis Ozone Nonattainment Area 

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources is required 
to submit mobile source emission budgets for conformity 
purposes for the St Louis ozone nonattainment area. This 
budget is a projected emissions inventory used to demon- 
strate reasonable further progress for a particular year 
specified in the State Implementation Plan. The mobile 
source emission budget establishes a cap on emissions 



ma 



AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 

STATE OF MISSOURI ) 
County of Boone ) 

I, Ryan Parks, being duly sworn according to law, state that I am one of the 
publishers of the Columbia Daily Tribune, a daily newspaper of general circulation 
in the County of Boone. State of Missouri, where located; which newspaper been 
admitted to the Post Office as periodical class matter in the City of Columbia, 
Missouri, the city of publication; which newspaper has been published regularly 
and consecutively for a period of three years and has a list of bona fide subscribers 
voluntarily engaged as such who have paid or agreed to pay a stated price for a 
subscription for a definite period of time, and that such newspaper has complied 
with the provision of Section 493.050, Revised Statutes of Missouri, 2000, and 
Section 59 J 10, Revised Statutes of Missouri, 2000. The affixed notice appeared in 
said newspaper in the following consecutive issues: 



1st Insertion, 
2nd Insertion, 
3rd Insertion, 
4th Insertion, 
5th Insertion, 
6th Insertion, 
7th Insertion, 
8th Insertion, 
9th Insertion, 
10th Insertion, 
1 1th Insertion, 
1 2th Insertion, 
1 3th Insertion. 
14th insertion, 
15th Insertion, 
1 6th Insertion. 
I7lh Insertion. 
18th Insertion, 
)9ih Insertion, 
20th Insertion. 
2 1st Insertion, 
22nd Insertion, 



September 20 



.2002 

"iboi" 

4002 



,2002 
",2002 
,2002 
,2002" 
.2002" 



By 



PRINTER^FEE: 



,2002 
",2002 
■2002 
^2002" 
3)02 

aobi 

£002 
4002" 
4002" 
4002 
4002 
4002 
4002 



$244.00 




Subscribed and sworn to before me this ^^ ^"^ day of ^Aj&p^W^a-t 



Notary Pubffc 



4002 



My Commission Expires 



Jan 3, 2006 



GEORGE W. ROBINSON 
Notary Public -Notary Seal 
STATE OF MISSOURI 
Boone County 
My Commission Expires: Jan. 3, 2006 



MISSOURI AIR CONSERVATION 
COMMISSION WILL HOLD 

PUBLIC HEARING 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO- The Mis- 
souri Air Conservation Commission 
will hold a public hearing on Emis- 
sions Banking and Trading, Restric- 
tion of Emissions of Lead From Spe- 
cific Lead Smelter-Refinery 
Installations, Operating Permit Pro- 
gram Deficiencies, Maintenance 
Plan for the St Louis G2coe Nonat- 
tainment Area, St. Louis Mobile 
Source Emission Budget for the St. 
Louis Ozone Nonattaimr-ent Area, 
Kansas City Ozone Maintenance 
Plan, and other issues on Thursday, 
October 24, 2002. The Public Hear- 
ing will begin at 9 ajn. ar The Trav- 
eler's Inn Christian Bed k Break- 
fast, Ballroom, 301 W. Washington, 
Kirksville, Missouri. The commis- 
sion will hear testimony related tcu 
die following rule actions. 

• 10 CSR 10-6.060 (amendment) 
Construction Permits Required 
This proposed amendment will 
remove the offset and banking 
provisions from this rule and 
add references to new rale, 10 
CSR 10-6:410 Emissions Bank- 
ing and Trading to avoid dupli- 
cative requirements, 

• 10 CSR 10-6.410 (new rule) ' 
Emissions Banking and Trad- 
ing 

This new rule was developed in 
accordance with 643.220 RSMo 
and outlines an emissions 
banking and trading program 
for criteria pollutants and their 
precursors. The goal of this 
program is to achieve arid 
maintain the National Ambient 
Air Quality Standards ic oonat- 
tainment and maintenance ar- 
eas in the state of Missouri 
Banking and trading programs 
allow facilities to earn emis- 
sions reduction credits by emit- 
ting below the applicabk stan- 
dard. The emissions recuction 
credits can be banked for later 
use or traded or sold to * dif- 
ferent facility. An environmen- 
tal contribution of 3% win be 
subtracted from the bank of 
credits each year. Thes^ pro- 
grams are both 

environmentally and economi- 
cally beneficial in nonsmin- 
ment and maintenance areas. 

• 10 CSR 1045. 120 (amencrjent) 
Restriction of Emissions of 
Lead From Specific Lead 
Smelter-Refinery InstaU^jons 



This proposed amendment w*s 
requested by the Doe Run 
Company for the Resourc 
cycling facility. Itwilllovv, 
the total daily throughput limit 
for the blast furnace and raise 
the total daily throughput limit 
for the rotary melt and reverba- 
tory furnaces. There will be no 
net lead emission increase as a 
result of this amendment." 
10 CSR 10-5.170 (amendment) 
Control of Odors From Pro- 
cessing of Animal Matter 
This proposed amendment will 
correct an incorrect rule refer- 
ence. 

10 CSR 10-6.065 (amendment) 
Operating Permits, 
This proposed amendment ad-. 
. dresses deficiencies in Missou- 
ri's Title V program identified 
by the Sierra Club and the U.S. 
Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA). Failure to 
adopt these amendments may 
cause the EPA to withdraw 
Missouri's Title V program- 
Maintenance Plan for the St 
Louis Ozone Noriattainment 
Area 

The Department of Natural Re- 
sources' Air Pollution Control 
Program has prepared a main- 
tenance plan for the SL Louis 
area to proceed with a redesig- 
nation request The SL Louis 
area is currently designated un- 
der the federal Clean Air Ac* - - 
a moderate nonattainment 
for ground level ozone. Th, 
ea is expected to attain the Ou_ 
hour ozone standard this year. 
The ozone season begins on 
April 1st and ends on October 
3 1st of each year. The redesig- 
nation request is based on 
three years of no violations of 
the standard during the period 
2000-2002. 

A maintenance plan is required 
before an area can be redesig- 
nated to attainment status. The 
maintenance plan outlines how 
over the next ten years the area 
will maintain air quality that 
meets the national ambient air 
quality standard. When areas 
are redesignated from nonat- 
tainment to attainment, they 
are commonly referred to as 
"maintenance areas". Mainte- 
nance areas are considered to 
be attainment areas since the 
air quality meets the national, 
ambient air quality standard. 
Once attainment is achieved, 
the area must continue to dem- 
onstrate (maintain) attainment' 
for at least 10 years after the 
U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency officially approves the 
redesignation request The 
maintenance plan includes an 
updated area emissions inven- 
tory, emissions growth projec- 
tions, contingency measures. u 
identifies the control measu 
in place that will be relied oi. 
maintain the air quality and it 
provides for continued opera- 
tion of the monitoring network. 
St. Louis MobUe^Source,Emis- 



a4 



coiCTMmrON will 

HOLD A PUBLIC 
HEARING 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - 
- The Missouri Air 
C' vatioo Commission 
v da public hearing 
-xssiojos Banking and 
jig, Restriction of 
Emissions of Lead from 
Specific Lead Smelter- 
Refinery Installations, 
Operating Permit Program 
Deficiencies, 
Maintenance Plan for the 
St. Louis Ozone 
NonaUainrnent Area, St. 
Louis Mobile Source 
Emission Budget for the 
Sl Louis Ozone 
Nonattainrrient Area, 
Kansas City Ozone 
Maintenance Plan, and 
other issues on Thursday, 
October 24, 2002. The 
Public Hearing will begin 
at 9 ajn- at the Traveler's 
Inn Christian Bed & 
Breakfast, Ballroom, 301 
W. Washington, 
Cirksvillc, Missouri The 
XHrimission will hear tes- 
imony related to the fol- 
owing rule actions. 

10 CSR 10-6.060 
(Amendment) 
Construction Permits 
Required 

This proposed amend- 
v will remove the 
and banking 
»ions from this 
jd add references 
to new rule, 10 CSR 
10-6.410 Emissions 
Banking and Trading 
to avoid duplicative 
requirements. 

10 CSR 10-6.410 (new 
rule) Emissions 
Banking and Trading 

This new rule, was 
developed in accor- 
dance with 643.220 
RSMo and outlines an 
emissions banking and 
trading program for 
criteria pollutants and 
their precursors. The 
goal of this program is 
to achieve and main- 
tain the National 
\mbient Air Quality 
Standards in nonat- 
ainmenf and mainte- 
lance areas in the state 
»f Missouri. 

banking and trading 
rograms allow facili- 
ics lo cam emissions 
eduction credits by 
milting below the 
ppli <:ablc standard. 
1v >sion rcduc- 
o ^Jits can be 
mtr -u later uk or 
m M>id lo a dif- 



*rr 

<h environmentally 
d cconorrucalJy ben- 



on uuce years of no 
. violations of the stan- 
dard during the period 
2000-2002. 

A maintenance plan is 
required before an area 
can be redesignated to 
attainment status. The 
maintenance plan out- 
lines how over the next 
ten years the area will 
maintain air quality 
that meets the national 
ambient air quality 
standard. When areas 
are redesignated from 
nonattainment to 
attainment, they are 
commonly referred to 
as "maintenance 
areas**. Maintenance 
areas are considered to 
be attainment areas 
since the air quality 
meets the national 
ambient air quality 
standard. Once attain- 
ment is achieved, the 
area must continue to 
demonstrate (main- 
tain) attainment for at 
least 10 years after the 
U.S. Environmental 
protection Agency 
officially approves the 
redesignation request. 
The maintenance plan 
includes an updated 
area emissions inven- 
tory, emissions growth 
projections, contin- 
gency measures, it 
identifies the control 
measures in place that 
will be relied on to 
maintain the air quality 
and it provides for 
continued operation of 
the monitoring net- 
work. 

SL Louis Mobile 
Source Emission 
Budget for the St 
Louis Ozone 
Nonattainrnent Area 

The , Missouri 
Department of Natural 
Resources is required 
to . submit mobile 
source emission bod- 
gets for confoTmity 
purposes for the St. 
Louis ozone nonattain- 
ment area. This budget 
is a projected emis- 
sions inventory used to 
demonstrate reason- 
able further progress 
for a particular year 
specified in the State 
Implementation Plan. 
The mobile source 
emission budget estab- 
lishes a cap on emis- 
sions that cannot be 
exceeded by predicted 
highway and transit 
vehicle emissions. The 
department has 
worked with the East- 
^cst Gateway 
Coordinating Council 
•"dibe mftmUtancc of m 
*°°*Hl» tourer worfc- 



T*" 30O4 mobile 
budget. 

Missouri State 



developed new projec- 
tions for- on- road 

mobile emission T£ q F MISSOURI) 
inventories, area 
source emission inven- 
tories and a new 
mobile emissions bud- 
get »n 



JNTY OF BUTLER) ss. 



„. Schrieber, being duly sworn according to law, state that I am PUBLISHER 
eDAILY AMERICAN REPUBLIC, adaily newspaper of general circulation 
Tne above documents wUi des of BuUer , Ripley, Carter, Wayne, Stoddard, New Madrid and 

t^Sl? Loot; which newspaper has been admitted to the Post Office as second class 

Missouri Department of = . Cit ^ of Poplar B luff, Missouri, the city of publicaUon; which newspapei 
N £ been published regularly and consecutively for a period of *ree years and has 

205 Jefferson St, Jeffrrson tof bona fide subscribers voluntarily engaged as such who have paid or agreed 
Qty, (573) 75MM7; . f subscrip tion for a definite period of time and that such 

l££ Lmplied with theprovisions of Section 493.050, Revised Statute, 
Jefeon Gty.(m 7 51 : fcsouri 1969. The affixed notice appeared in said newspaper in the following 

2729; Kansas Qty Regional 

Office, 500 NE Coibem ;ecutive issues: 
Road, Lee's Summit, 



Insertion 
Insertion 
Insertion 
Insertion 



Vol, 



Vol... 
Vol ... 
Vol- 



Insertion Vol 



Insertion Vol 



Insertion 
Insertion 
Insertion 
Insertion 



Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol. 
Vol. 



bscribed and sworn to before me this 



(816) 622-7000; Northeast 
Regional Office, 1709 
Prospect Drive, Macon, 
(660) 385-2129; Southeast 
Regional Office, 948 Lester 
Street Poplar Bluff; (573) 
840-9750; St Louis 
Regional Office, 9200 
Watson Road, SL Louis, 
(314) 301-7600; Southwest 
Regional Office, 2040 W. 
Woodland, Springfield, 
(417)89M30a 

Persons with disabilities 
requiring special services or 
accommodations to attend 
the meeting can make 
arrangements by calling the 
division directly at (573) 
751-7840, the department's 
tofl free number at (800) 
334-6946, or by writing 
two weeks in advance of 
the meeting to: Missouri 
Department of Natural 
Resources, Air 
Conservation Commission 
Secretary, P.O. Box 176, 
Jefferson Qty, MO 65102. 
Hearing impaired persons 
may contact the program 
through Relay Missouri, 
(800)735-2966. 



Hie commission holds 
public hearings under the 

provisions of .chapter 643, „ , . • „ 

rsmo. cstize^wishiug commission expires 

to speak at the public hear- 
ing should notify me sec- ublication Fee $ 

retary to the Missouri Air 
Conservation 
Commission, Missouri 
Department of Natural 
Resources, Air Pollution 
Control Program, P.O. 
Box 176, Jefferson City, 
Missouri 65102-0176, or 
telephone (573) 751-7840. 
The department requests 
persons intending to give . 
verbal presentations also 
provide a written copy of ; 
their testimony to the j 
commission secretary at 
the time of the public 
hearing. The department 
also will accept written 
comments for the record 
until 5 p.m. on October 
31. 2002: plcjuce send two 
copica of written coni- 
**» Chwe. funning 
Section, Air Pollution 
Control Program. P.O 
Box 176, Jcflicrson Cily 
MO 65102-0176 



EI 



No. 



No 

No 

No 



No 
.No 



.... No 



3,1^........3C>..d a yofSQ.p20D< 

„ day of 

day of 

day of 

day of 

, day of 

day of .... 

day of .... 

day of .... 

day of .... 



, ^lo «•■»*.*....«..>.*•< 

, ^io ••»»»••»«■"•••"' 

No 



.20 . 
.20 . 
.20 . 
..20 . 
..20 . 
„20 . 
..20 . 
..20 



.20 



PUBLISI 

.dayofSJ 




L 



LOUIS POST-DiSrWCH 



LLC of PULITZER 



AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 



:rmoi po'i 



A0ICNC3388592 



CHERI BECHTEL A/P 

MDNR - AIR POLLUTION CONTROL 

POBOX 176 

JEFFERSON CITY MO 65102 



THE ATTACHED ADVERTISEMENT WAS PUBLISHED IN THE ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH IN 
CLASSIFICATION 9000, 01 TIME, STARTING ON SEPTEMBER 18, 2002 AND ENDING ON 
SEPTEMBER 1 8, 2002. THE ATTACHED ADVERTISEMENT RAN: 

SEPT 18 



MISSOURI AIR CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARING 

7FERS0N QTXHO — ftelfcsouiAf Cttereta bnvssbi ifl 

mJ^teftaylrstei^Optrafeq 

i* Ozone JtortaHnert Area, 1^ 

*«BreaI^8alrOTL3u1^ Tbcauim*ha*3^*miit*Uo^t*xte 

WCSRlMi)60(aneadmetf} Drcta&ontaBfeRerjjred 
tepmposd amende id 



10 CSRHW4K) ft* nrie) Emmons Baring andtafcg 

life «ewrttn developed sarxontoiB Tteordgftttpro- 
iqasbKliewariia^tefefriia' ft ^ 

Banj^arftairig procure aicwlar£fe The cnasonredutinnaerjfc can be total to tato use 

artie<dgscBtea<Bfaertfacil» AflenwonmcnMcrtri^ The se pr o gram are both em w r w c rtaft and em- 

vocafy ucirfcud in nrafiannent and Biautaatje 

Ms proposed araerifcnent vcs requested by fee Doe Bun Ctf^ty to RuJUtt Recydng tacafy l«Clmertetottoajlyfflx0^M 



»CSt104T7O<a 



Q Cbabol of Odors Praia faoccs^tfAjnal Ifattor 



WOT mi)65 freandnenD, Open** Perots 

te proposed ■BenJmetjAlrrOTdr^^ Fata to adapt tee 

■iiitoKiwfauseteTJAtowflntay tesourfiTBeVprograa. 

IMJeaance Plan fcr tie :£L loos Ozone fenaflainartArea 

to Departed rifefarttefflm^ A* The St Lous area is 

Me^deaiBn^a^tcfcdedDeaJftMgataataateo 

BMim itfrt ends cb fetter 3tt^^ 

I MHi fc iiM rr i i l wi ii mywiiTl firfrwr imTrn rmhr i n li iK j iihittitthinmntitlli* TlK mMtomr fr& fa hM0MtemA1mitmt1teMta*mattM9^1& 
M&t£W&c&M&eiMtf8fbfihNhti. When areas arc f e dcsa jaM twacflaoato^ Ma rtcn m 
iWBteoastaadtobeaittnr^areasro Onjttameitfbiriieved,leam^afte 
aartifl dla ppeittoatleasnOje^ The oortranoe plan ndudes an apdatoJ area 

mssstb InealDnxecBssnoQnMrfh prcicdicps,con6naflicy a e 3s u ^ 
nrarced ciicr abort of tie Buntarmrj nehwrk. 



4ER SERVICE MANXGER 



He lissoui DeparWrtol Nanni fiesoates craqtirediDsubrt mcttewwein 



n buJQefc to cuAunnty puprats to tE Si Louis none nonaftaimerl aro ThsbadpjetB 



lOjecWeiwstoBiwentoyasedto ThenUeft^ene^buc^estab- 

ista a caw wemssnnsW carrot ItedepartaerfbasiwrtedwWtiebsM^ 

I 

he asastarrz of a we* auros wrtgroup in cato^^3fsr2004nobie»EnebaaoeL 



n to (SPK Leal Ran to ire Ooe Run Resource Raying ta*rr Mear fed* MO 



fterevistoAOf tvMss^SP.L^PtantotvOw 

ewe turnace throughpi hurts. These changes aftHr (be tacrirt)r orstBr otcraUnaf fleAUy MtfniK wnng nef lead ejiwwru Addboru*f I corrects Grammatical errors and 
criatete quartertrwnteresufls. Theansamiedestooterfasai&to^offlielt^^ 

ry mrikrtd ejtceedarces wet tot despjBfofl was made Thoetare.it is ntf •McaarftoUertrffadrttondeiaerMnsreduSons The ptan must onfrj denwistnfc Hal rl Htade- 
juately protect t* WWB from Mure eoeedances 

(areas OtyOJDneH LMfcnac t Wan 
^Ikssari Deprt"erttf*tato*Rewces"A* 

Uma iaicearM TbeMsnriAjrforoerwbrjnConv^^ towrrH.nrwtcorsnx 
ncadntcatotolpapiite^e«npiof^ IteanoKfeKatoinvarJM twenty p^ 

i ia erjrjr * tooHoadfrtte pniw i^ 

■*wea9anert«a^»»^toftwewitfi»t*^ itaar>r>parD^(**rtrt ftorxra 

1-4817. JpfWwOtrfteponrfOOcf 710 ttamm R»d JrtVr^ (>,. rjn-7!,l-77?9 »jnmC^»K^ OTto HOW CdtenftMl l« Sumi {gieO?-70f» fcrtwtf 
wrtMOtc* ITDOhaptf t>*t Ux«n (tfifl. 361 7T?9 iu3«si Hr^rwtf Offer W|wi Stwl 8LT fiTJfMOaTSO S» Uut DBc* S?00 Ibbrn *»□*: S 





TO ANIXSOBSCRIBED BEFORE ME, 
DAY OF SEPTEMBER. 2002. 



A', 



7 PUBLIC, CITY OF ST. LOUIS 



^IT CHARGE $5.00 EACH 

v-. r> mm Jt L °ws r. oun , 



FIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 



THE KANSAS CITY STAR COMPANY, publishers of 
THE KANSAS CITY STAR, a newspaper published in 
the City of Kansas City, County of Jackson, State of 
Missouri, confirms that the notice and/or advertisement of 

MO DEPT OF NATURAL RESOURCES 
AIR POLLUTION CONTROL PROGRAM 
PO BOX 176 

JEFFERSON CITY MO 65102 

22428421 

7518430 

a true copy of which is hereto attached, 

was duly published in the above said newspaper 

FOR THE PERIOD OF: 1 Day(s) 

COMMENCING: September 20,2002 

F M QING: September 20,2002 

AR EDITION (S): 9/20/ 

STAR PAPER (S): 3 

VOLUME: #123 



Subscribed and sworn to before me, 
this Friday, 20 September, 2002 . 
I certify that I was duly qualified 
as a Notary Public for the State of 
Missouri, commissioned in Jackson 
County, Missouri. My commission 
expires August 1 8, 2006. 




Laura S. Keeling, Notary 




~ wilX HOLD PUBLIC HEARING 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The. Missouri Air Con- 
servation Commission will hold a public hearing 
on Emissions Banking and Trading, Restriction of 
Emissions of Lead From Specific Lead Smelter- 
Refinery Installations, Operating Permit Pro- 
gram Deficiencies, Maintenance Plan for the 5T 
Louis Ozone Nonattalnment Area, St. Louis Mo- 
bile Source Emission Budget for the St. Louis 
Ozone Nonattalnment Area, Kansas City Ozone 
Maintenance Plan, and other Issues on Thursday/ 
October 24, 2002. The Public Hearing will begin at 
9 a.m. at the Traveler's inn Christian Bed & 
Breakfast, Ballroom, 301 W. Washington, 
ICirksvllle, Missouri. The commission will hear 
testimony related to the following rule actions. 

• 10 CSR 10-6J060 (amendment) Construction Per- 
mits Required 

This proposed amendment will remove the offset 
and banking provisions from this rule and ado 
references to new rule, 10 CSR 10-o\410 Emissions 
Banking and Trading to avoid duplicative re- 
quirements. 

* 10 CSR 10-6410 (new rule) Emissions Banking 
and Trading 

This new rule was developed In accordance with 
44X220 RSMo and outlines an emissions banking 
and trading program for criteria pollutants and 
their, precursors. The goal of this program Is to 
achieve and maintain the National Ambient Air 
Quality Standards In nonattalnment and malnte- 
i areas In the state of Missouri. 



Banking and trading programs -allow facilities to 
earn emissions reduction credits by emitting be- 
low the applicable standard. The emission reduc- 
tion credits can be banked for later use or traded 
or sold to a different facility. An environmental 
contribution of 3 % will be subtracted from the 
batik of credits each year. These programs ore 
both environmental I y and economically beneficial 
ki nonattalnment and maintenance areas. 

• 10 CSR 10-4.120 (amendment) Restriction of 
Emissions of Lead From Specific Lead Smelter- 
Refinery Installations ; 

This proposed amendment was requested by the 
Doe Run Company for the Resource Recycling fa- 
cility. It will lower the total dally throughput limit 
for the blast furnace and raise the total doily 
throughput limit for the rotary melt and reverbo- 
tory furnaces. There will be no net lead emission 
Increase as a result of this amendment. 

• 10 CSR 10-5.170 (amendment) Control of Odors 
From Processing of Animal Matter 

This proposed amendment will correct an incor- 
rect rule reference; - 

• 10 CSR 10-6J065 (amendment) Operating Per-mits 

This proposed amendment addresses deficiencies 
m Missouri's Title V program identified by the Si- 
erra Club and the U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency (EPA). Failure to adopt these amend- 
ments may cause the EPA to withdraw Missouri's 
Title V program. 

• Maintenance Plan for the St. Loujs Ozone Nonat- 
talnment Area 

The Department of Natural Resources* Air Pollu- 
tion Control Program has prepared a mainte- 
nance plan for the St. Louis area to proceed with 
a redestgnotlon request. The St. Loyte area is cur- 
rently designated under the federal Clean Air Act 
as a moderate nonottolnnlent area for ground 
level ozone. The area Is expected to attain the 
one-hour ozone standard this year. The ozone sea- 
sanbeglns on April 1st and em* on October 31st 
of each year. The redeslgnatlon request Is based 
on three years of .no v iolations of the standard 
during the period 2000-2002. 

A maintenance plan Is required before an area 
can be redesignated to attainment status. The 
maintenance plan outlines how over the next ten 
years the area will maintain air quality that 
meets the national ambient air quality standard. 
When areas are redesignated from nonattalnment 
to attainment they are commonly referred to as 
•maintenance areas*. Maintenance areas are con- 
sidered to be attainment areas since the air qua) 
Ify meets the national ambient air quality stan- 
dard Once attainment Is achieved, the area must 
continue to demonstrate (maintain) attainment 
for at least 10 years after the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency officially approves the redes- 
lgnatlon request. The maintenance plan Includes 
an updated area emissions Inventory, emissions 
growth projections, contingency measures. It 
identifies the control measures In ploce that will 
be relied on to maintain the air quality and it 
provides for continued operation of the monitor- 
ing network. 

• Si. Louis Mobile Source Emission Budget tor 
the St. Louis Ozone Nonattalnment Area 

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources Is 
required to submit mobile source emission budg- 
ets for conformity purposes for the St. Louis 
ozone nonattalnment area. This budget Is o pro- 
tected emissions Inventory used to demonstrate 
reosonoble further progress tor a particular year 
specified In the State Implementation Plan. The 
mobile source emission budget establishes a coo 
on emissions that cannot be exceeded by pre- 
dicted highway and transit vehicle emissions. The 
deportment has worked with the East-West Gate- 
way Coordinating Council and the assistance ot a 



im 



AFFIDAVIT OF PUBLICATION 
STATE OF MISSOURI 
COUNTY OF ADAIR 



I, Larry W. Freds, being duly sworn, according to law, state that I am the Publisher of Kirksville 
Daily Express, a daily newspaper of general circulation in the County of Adair, State of Missouri, 
where located; which newspaper has been admitted to the Post Office as periodical class matter in 
the City of Kirksville, Missouri, the city of publication; which newspaper has been published 
regularly and consecutively for a period of three years and has a list of boaa fide subscribers, 
voluntarily engaged as such who have paid or agreed to pay a stated price for a subscription for a 
definite period of time, and that such newspaper has complied with the provisions of Section 
493.050, Revised Statutes of Missouri 2000, and Section 59.310, Revised Siatutes of Missouri 
2000. The affixed notice appeared in said newspaper in the following consecutive issues. 

First Insertion Vol. 101 N o. 2 * 9 . 17 1* 1 day o f September ^Q02 



Second Insertion Vol N o. , day of ,2002 

Third Insertion Vol, No. , day of ,2002 

Fourth Insertion VoL No._ , day of ,2002 



Fifth Insertion Vol._ No. , day of ,2002 




Notary Public 
My Commission Expires February 21, 2003, 



Publication Fee $ 451-50 



Received payment 



MISSOURI AIR CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
WILL HOLD PUBLIC HEARING 
JEFFERSON CITY, MO - The Missouri Air Conservation Commission w;l 
hold a public hearing on Emissions Banking and Trading, Restriction z? 
Emissions of Lead From Specific Lead Smelter-Refinery Installations, Or- 
ating Permit Program Deficiencies, Maintenance Plan for the St. Louis Ozc~~ 
Nonattainment Area, St. Louis Mobile Source Emission Budget for the 
Louis Ozone Nonattainment Area, Kansas City Ozone Maintenance P^'. 
and other issues on Thursday. October 24, 2002. The Public Hearing v.vi 
begin at 9 a.m. at the Traveler's Inn Christian Bed & Breakfast, Ballroom. 31 * 
W. Washington. Kirksville, Missouri. The commission will hear testimony 
related to the following rule actions. 



. ^, \t OUiHStMVAl IUN COMMISSION WILL | 

j HOLD PUBJJC HEARING 

JEFFERSON CITY, MO - TW Missouri Air Conservation 
CommtesJon wfli hokj a public hearing on Emissions Banking 
and Trading, Restriction of Emissions of Lead From Specific 
Lead Smelter-Refinery Installations, Operating Permit 
Program Deficiencies, Maintenance Plan lor the St Louis 
Ozone Nonattainment Area, SL Louis Mobile Source 
Emission Budget for the SL Louis Ozone Nonattainmerrt 
a. Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan, and other 
b« on Thursday, October 14. 2002. The Public Hearing 
begin at 9 a.m, at the Traveler's Inn Christian Bed &\ 
eakfast Ballroom. 301 W. Washington. WrksvWe, Missouri. ! 
'he commission win hear testimony related to the following 
fute actions, 

* 10 CSR 10-6.060 (amendment) Construction Permits 
Required 

This proposed amendment will remove the offset and 
banking provisions from this rule and add references to 
new rule, 10 CSR 10-6.410 Emissions Banking and 
Tracing to avoid duplicative requirements. J p Q0S 

* 10 CSR 10-6.410 (new rule) Emissions Banking and 
Tradmg 

This new ruie was developed fen accordance with 643-220 
RSMo and outlines an emissions banking and trading pro-' 
gram for criteria pollutants and their precursors. The goal 
of this program is to achieve and maintain the National 
Ambtent Air OuaCty Standards in nonaflalnment and main- 
tenance areas in the state of Missouri. 

Banking and trading programs allow (atifties to earn emis- 
sions reduction credits by emitting below the appficable 
standard. The emission reduction credits can be banked 
tor later use or traded or soW to a different fadfity. An envi- 
ronmental contribution of 3% will be subtracted from the 
bank of credits each year. These programs are both envJ- 
ronmentatty and eccrornJcaJly beneficial in nonattainrnent 
, and rnaronance areas. 

* 10 CSR 10-6.120 (arnenomerrt) Restriction of Emissions of 
Lead From Specific Lead Srrteiter-Refiriery Instaftatiorts 

This proposed atnendrnent was requested by the Doe Run 
Company for the Resource Recycling fadUty. tt wW lower 
ihe total daily throughput Smft for the blast furnace and 
raise the total dairy throughput fimtt for the rotary melt and 
reverbatory furnaces. There wit! be no net lead emission 
increase as a result of this ainendrnent 

' 10 CSR 10-5.170 (amendment) Control of Odors From 
Processing of ArtmaJ Matter 

This proposed amendment wfli correct an incorrect rule 
reference. 

• 10 CSR 10-6.065 (amendment) Operating Permits 

proposed amendment addresses deficiencies in 
ourffi iTitte V program identified by the Siena Club and 
J.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Failure 

-dopt these amendments may cause the EPA to witfv 

w Missouri's title V program. 

: Maintenance Pian tor the SL Louis Ozone Nonattainment 
L Area 

y 

L J he D epartment of Natural Resources' Air Pollution 
Control Program has prepared a inaimenance plan for the 
S* Loute area to proceed with a redesigjiatkm rwjuesL 
US ^i?^ 1 ?!? b curren ^V r designated under the fed- 
^^^J^fl^ rnoderate nonattainment area for 
ground levd ozone. The area ts expected to attain the one- 
nour ozone standard this year. The ozone season begins 
orrAprH 1st and ends on October 31st of each year The 

tons of the standard during the period 2000-2002. 

' £JH!$ 1te !? t F* P**" fa roofed before an area can be 
i ^^gnatod to attainment status. The maintenance plan 

a^quafity that meets the national ambtent air quafity stan- 

1 f««nce areas . Makitenance areas are considered to be 

' fttwTment areas since the air quality meets the rwtftonS 

i amWentatrouaary standee 

I • h fJ? I 2 a conttriue to o^monstrate (maintain) attain^ 

[ ^J^^^^E^.*"" U S ' &>vironrnentaf 

t ofrKialiy approves the reclamation 

I ^^bJ^LZSSf^!^ ^ i" * ** «?**ed area 

that wffl be relied on to maintaJn the air quality and rtDTc- 
vxtes twccot«ued operation of the nx)oitc<ing networic 

* 2- L 00 ^ Moi *e Source Emission Budget for the St Louis 
OzoroNonattairmemArBa 



"m tt Sprincfield "w~ 

News-Leader 



651 Boonville • MPO Box 798 
Springfield, Missouri 65801 
Telephone (417) 836-1100 



September 23, 2002 




PROOF OF PUBLICATION 

STATE OF MISSOURI 
County of Greene 

1, Marsha Burnett of Springfield, Missouri, of lawful age, do upon 
my oath state that I am the Legal Clerk ofthe News-Leader, and that I am 
duly authorized to and do make this afidavit for and on behalf of the News- 
Leader, a newspaper published daily in the City of Springfield, Greene 
County, Missouri; that the public advertisement, notice or order of 
publication, a true copy of which is hereto attached, was published in said 
newspaper 1 time(s) upon the following dates: 



First publication on Thursday, September 19, 2002 
Second publication on 
Third publication on 
Fourth publication on 
Last publication on 

I do further state under oath that said newspaper has been 
admitted to the Post Office as second class matter that it is a nevepaper of 
general circulation in the City of Springfield, Missouri; that it has been 
published regularly and consecutively for a period of more than three years; 
that it has a list of bona fide subscribers voluntarily engaged as such; who 
have paid or agreed to pay a stated price for a subscription for a definite 
period of time, and that said newspaper has complied with the provisions of 
Section 14968 Revised Statues of Missouri, 1939. relating to "Public 
Advertisements." 



St^^lSSlJ 1 *" 1 rf NaturaJ R *so"rces ts required ' M I \ 
pujposes tor the St Louis ozone nonattainment area. This i 
budget ts a projected emissions inventory used tadenw 
strafe re^onabte further progress fork *^la?JeaY 
specrhed to the State Irnplementation Plan The Tnwbite 



ifore me this Q ?> r - 



D 



*-^PhL»«f Ptan lor ' 




Day of ^ijLpW /rwio^ ,2002 

Notary Public in and for 
Greene County, Missouri 



€j> GANNETT 



***** fret*****, o^id SSSJSKS^ toxttMtny 1 

Jtatlonal Ambtent A(r Ouatrtv Sta^l^fS!!" 1 * 01 of the I 
December 2000. er K ^^4v^f,^ A ^> *«ad inf 
«ce«oances since that designSon 
n Is noi necessary to ari^Z ? ^ Tr * r e*ore 



(Witness sworn . ) 

MR. HINES: Good morning, Madam Commissioner 
and Members of Commission. 

CHAIRPERSON BEARD: Good morning. 

COMMISSIONER COLLINS: Good morning. 

MR. HINES: My name is Tim Hines . I'm an 
environmental engineer with the Department's Air 
Pollution Control Program. I work at 205 Jefferson 
Street in Jefferson City, Missouri. And I'm here to 
present testimony for the proposed new mobile budgets 
for the 2002 Kansas City maintenance plan. 

The information on the emission budgets begins 
on page 95 of the briefing document. The last time I 
was here, I talked about the projected impact of new 
population and employment forecast , and that's really 
what I'm gonna follow up on. 

The overview of today's presentation is I'm 
going to consider the issues surrounding the need to 
change the mobile emission budget, and we're going to 
review the new mobile emission budget inventory 
numbers . 

One of the first issues we had is when do you 

change the mobile emission budget? We looked at 

several things: When you have untimely arrival of new 

regional forecasts, when you review those forecasts and 

ASSOCIATED COURT REPORTERS 
(573) 636-7551 JEFFERSON CITY, MO 65101 
TOLL FREE 1-800-636-7551 
48 



3.4.11 



Appendix K 



Public Hearing Comments and Responses on Revised Budget 



COMMENTS AND RESPONSES ON 
PROPOSED REVISIONS TO THE 
KANSAS CITY OZONE MAINTENANCE PLAN 

AND 

RECOMMENDATION FOR ADOPTION 

On October 24, 2002, the Missouri Air Conservation Commission (MACC) held a public 
hearing concerning revised mobile source emissions budgets for the Kansas City Ozone 
Maintenance Plan. The following is a summary of comments received and the Department 
of Natural Resources' corresponding responses. Any changes to the proposed state 
implementation plan are identified in the responses to comments. 

The Missouri Department of Natural Resources' Air Pollution Control Program recommends 
the commission adopt the plan action as proposed. If the commission adopts this plan action, 
it will be the department's intention to submit this plan action to the U.S. Environmental 
Protection Agency for inclusion in the Missouri State Implementation Plan. 

SUMMARY OF COMMENTS: No written or verbal comments were received concerning 
this proposed revision. 



in 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 

This page left intentionally blank. 



112 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



3.4.12 Appendix L 



MACC Adoption Certification for Revised Budgets and Inventory 



113 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



Pursuant to 643.055 RSMo, the Missouri Air Conservation Commission has 
determined that this action is needed to have a U.S. Environmental Protection 
Agency approved State Implementation Plan. 

Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan is hereby adopted by the Missouri Air 
Conservation Commission this 5th day of December, 2002. 




, Chairman 



, Member 



t Member 



, Member 



, Member 



, Member 



, Member 



114 



2002 Kansas City Ozone Maintenance Plan 



•13 Appendix M 



Final EPA Approval of 2002 Kansas City Maintenance Plan 



115